Temple Theatre

117 W. Broadway Street,
Ardmore, OK 73401

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Temple Theatre

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The Temple Theater was located in what is now the Ardmoreite (newspaper) building. It was in operation circa the 1930’s.

Contributed by Lauren Grubb

Recent comments (view all 7 comments)

Ken Roe
Ken Roe on July 23, 2005 at 10:25 pm

Listed in the 1940 Film Daily Yearbook (960 seats). It is listed as ‘Closed’ in the 1943 edition of F.D.Y. In the 1950 edition of F.D.Y. is is open again and has 750 seats

raybradley
raybradley on August 13, 2007 at 2:08 am

To see exterior/interior photos of the Temple Theatre type in word “theatre”, then search…
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raybradley
raybradley on July 15, 2010 at 3:28 am

A few vintage photos witness what the former Temple Theatre once looked like. These days the auditorium is used as a newpaper printing facility.
TEMPLE THEATRE, 117 W. Broadway, Ardmore, OK
http://www.roadsideoklahoma.com/node/235

raybradley
raybradley on March 11, 2011 at 12:50 am

This is what the former Temple Theatre looks like these days.
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Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on December 22, 2013 at 5:53 am

I think that the Temple Theatre in Ardmore might be the house that appears as the Shrine Theatre in a list of theaters designed by architect Leonard H. Bailey that appeared in the October 25, 1930, issue of Exhibitors Herald-World. There is a Masonic lodge on the fifth floor of the building.

Lucky
Lucky on May 7, 2016 at 7:28 pm

The chiseled corner stone states this structure was built as the Gilbert Bldg. in 1930, architect was J.B White. The book ‘CARTER COUNTY, THEN and NOW’, by Bob Burke and Eric Dabney also backs up this fact.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on May 7, 2016 at 9:57 pm

It’s not unusual for a building housing both a theater and offices or other uses to have two architects. J.B. White was a well known local architect in Ardmore, and so would have been a logical choice to handle a major local project, but had probably never designed a theater.

Leonard H. Bailey was an Oklahoma City architect who had experience designing theaters, and was probably brought in by the owners to handle that portion of the project. White, being local, was most likely also the supervising architect who oversaw the construction.

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