Fox Belmont Theatre

4918 E. Second Street,
Long Beach, CA

Unfavorite 6 people favorited this theater

Fox Belmont Theatre exterior

Viewing: Photo | Street View

Contributed by William Gabel

Recent comments (view all 25 comments)

GaryParks
GaryParks on December 21, 2006 at 5:35 pm

I can confirm the immediately previous post. I remember seeing “The Sound of Music” at the Crest. It was one of probably the first three or four movies I ever saw.

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on July 6, 2007 at 9:06 pm

An article in the LA Times on 8/17/78 discussed the future of the Belmont, which was then in serious disrepair. One potential buyer wanted to fix up the theater and show classic films. Another potential owner wanted to put racquetball courts in the building. Take a guess who won.

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on August 26, 2007 at 12:58 pm

Here is a November 1963 ad from the Press-Telegram:
http://tinyurl.com/yu56tf

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on March 16, 2008 at 6:13 pm

The top left photo shows part of the marquee in the mid 70s:
http://tinyurl.com/2qrceu

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on March 16, 2008 at 9:32 pm

I think if you were around the theater everyday like I am, you would appreciate the photo more. The gym is very drab. I liked the color, which certainly is not part of the building now.

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on December 18, 2008 at 7:04 pm

Here is an expanded view of the photo at the top of the page:
http://jpg2.lapl.org/theater1/00014837.jpg

Here is an undated LAPL photo:
http://jpg2.lapl.org/theater1/00014836.jpg

GaryParks
GaryParks on December 18, 2008 at 9:24 pm

Ken mc: Interesting photo you just posted. I didn’t know there was a “second” marquee on the theatre, that trapezoid being a very typical example of what Fox put on their houses in the late 30s. So that one existed between the original, rather understated rectangular marquee, and the wild neon one from the Skouras remodeling, which is the one I remember vividly from my childhood, which in the late 60s/early 70s, was excellently maintained, and I loved just looking at it and watching the animation of all that neon. I still remember the ways in which some parts moved.

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on February 16, 2009 at 3:05 pm

Here is an article from the LB Press-Telegram dated 9/20/77:

The Belmont Theater has ended a nearly 50-year engagement spanning the dawn of talkies to the hits of the 70s. The Belmont, located in the heart of Belmont Shore at 4918 E. Second St., has become the fourth Long Beach movie house this year to sell its last box of popcorn. Earlier this year the roof of the Towne Theater at 4425 Atlantic Ave. fell in and the movie house was put up for sale for $500,000. About a month ago, Mann Theatres Corp. closed the downtown Imperial Theater on Ocean Boulevard just east of Long Beach Boulevard. The Plaza Theatre on Spring Street also closed recently. And on Sept. 6, the final movie, “New York New York,” played at Mann’s Belmont.

“It (the Belmont) didn’t do us any business,” said Gary Goodgame, a property manager for Mann Theatres in Los Angeles. “We’re getting rid of old houses and building new ones,” he said. Mann has no plans to build any theaters in Long Beach, he added. Another reason cited for the closing of older theaters is increased competition from new multiscreen theaters in shopping centers.

Greg Schultz, a leasing agent for Coldwell Banker, which is handling the Belmont, said the theater could not compete with the recently built United Artist’s Movie 6 at the Market Place on Pacific Coast Highway. Schultz said Mann sold its long-term lease on the Belmont to a private investor. He would not reveal the selling price or the name of the buyer. “Theaters don’t usually pay the kind of rent we’re asking,” he said, adding that a theater probably won’t be the new tenant.

He said he has discussed the leasing of the 10,000-square-foot theater with local business groups and city officials. “We’re trying to do something to benefit the community,” he said. Although Schultz would not say specifically what is planned, a spokesman for Mann said he understands a number of small shops will be housed in the building. Goodgame said Mann is looking for a tenant to lease the Imperial Theater for movies or other businesses.

Mann has no plans to sell its other theater in Long Beach, the Crest on Atlantic Avenue. Another downtown theater, the State at 104 E. Ocean Blvd., also closed several weeks ago. Leasing agent Jeanice Allen said the theater was closed for repairs, but no date has been set for reopening. The theater, located in the Jergins Trust Building, is owned in part by John Paganelli of San Francisco.
The closing of the Belmont has led to a flurry of calls to Schultz at Coldwell Banker. He said the now boarded-up theater was built in about 1929. Its rococo marquee apparently will remain empty, for there are no coming attractions.

ljsspot
ljsspot on March 14, 2009 at 5:29 pm

From L.B. Heritage.com
Reginald F. Inwood’s name first appeared in the Long Beach
Press-Telegram in 1928, as architect of the Art Deco Belmont Shore Theater at 4918 E. 2nd St., corner of St. Joseph Ave. George T. Gayton was the contractor. The theater, completed in 1929, was owned by H. A. and W. C. Woodworth and was built especially for “talkies.” The building included seven stores on the first floor and apartments above. It reputedly cost $120,000.The exterior of the theater was painted blue-green and had geometric ornamentation. A portion of this décor can still be seen on the exterior, but the murals inside that featured Diana, the Roman goddess of the hunt, a snake charmer, and exotic birds have been removed.

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