Corner Cinema

820 Seven Sisters Road,
London, N15 5PQ

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Corner Picture Theatre

Viewing: Photo | Street View

Opened in April 1911 as the Corner Picture Theatre, it was located in the north London inner city district of South Tottenham, on the south west corner of Seven Sisters Road at the junction of Tottenham High Road. It had a prominent position at this busy intersection and the corner entrance of the building had elaborate decorations, surmounted by a dome on top. Seating was provided in stalls and a small balcony area.

By 1926 it had been taken over by Ben Jay who operated several other local cinemas and in 1938 Davies Cinemas were the operators.

It closed on 27th August 1960 with a double bill typical of its usual programmes over the years; Burt Lancaster in “The Flame and the Arrow” and Randolph Scott in “Shoot-Out at Medicine Bend”.

It was converted into an independently run bingo hall which operated for only a few years. It was then converted into a music club, named the Noreik Club and hosted many ‘name’ stars of their day. Keeping the Noreik name, it later became a nightclub, frequented mainly by blacks, and this finally closed in 1979. The building lay closed and boarded up until it was demolished in June 1980. An office block for local Council use named Apex House was built on the site in 1988.

Contributed by KenRoe

Recent comments (view all 14 comments)

jeremyb
jeremyb on August 26, 2009 at 11:35 am

Hi Doolally, I have tried to research that but can’t find much. I believe that Noreik is a fairly common surname in Norway…maybe the owner had Norwegian connections!!

exciterlamp
exciterlamp on September 18, 2009 at 5:26 am

It is Kieron backwards.

Doolally
Doolally on September 18, 2009 at 11:13 am

Kevin, so it is!

ouy knaht!

jeremyb
jeremyb on September 18, 2009 at 11:55 am

And thanks to Kevin’s lead, I discovered that Kieron was the name of the son of the club’s owner, Laurie Boost, who was the business partner of Laurie Jay.

Yvonne1
Yvonne1 on December 10, 2009 at 7:31 pm

KenRoe, You stated “Keeping the Noreik name, it later became a nightclub, frequented mainly by blacks…”

Why did you feel that you needed to refer to the colour of people who visited club Noreik? Why? Is it an issue for you?

exciterlamp
exciterlamp on January 15, 2010 at 10:15 am

Candice, When I read Mr Roe’s comments I took them to be a statement of fact. Would you be making a similar fuss if he said that the club had been frequented by Scots or Irish?

laurieboost
laurieboost on January 17, 2010 at 4:19 pm

Hi Laurie Boost Jnr here, the Club Noreik did indeed get its name from my brother Kierons name backwards. The club was compulsory purchased in the late 70s for redevelopment.

exciterlamp
exciterlamp on February 19, 2010 at 12:19 pm

No reply from Candice re my resonse to her comments on Ken Roe’s posting. This is her only posting. She obviously has an agenda which has nothing to do with the love of old cinemas.

exciterlamp
exciterlamp on February 19, 2010 at 12:32 pm

Hi Laurie. I don’t suppose that you have any photos of the inside of the Corner even as a club? I started at St Ignatius College, Stamford Hill, in 1959 and used to look at the stills outside the Corner, though I never went in. It closed not long after. I remember that a couple of doors up there was a sweet shop, where they made delicious sweets on the premises. Happy days!

jeremyb
jeremyb on February 19, 2010 at 6:31 pm

Hi Kevin, this clip of Club Noreik is on youtube, but you don’t see much of the interior:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sRp88w-e1gg

Best wishes, Jeremy

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