Lyric Theatre

7208 Pacific Boulevard,
Huntington Park, CA 90255

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Lyric Theatre exterior

Viewing: Photo | Street View

Opened in June 1922, the Lyric Theatre was later a district 4 Fox house. It finished its final days as a Pussycat Theatre.

Contributed by William Gabel

Recent comments (view all 25 comments)

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on October 12, 2007 at 7:08 am

Here is a 1970 ad from the LA Times:
http://tinyurl.com/35eyk6

JayAllenSanford
JayAllenSanford on August 8, 2008 at 7:29 am

New book-length Pussycat Theatre history from the San Diego Reader:
View link

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on September 28, 2008 at 9:27 pm

Here is a May 1969 ad from the LA Times. 2069 A.D. is not that far away now,
http://tinyurl.com/3gnawl

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on June 11, 2009 at 10:49 pm

Here is an August 1960 ad from the Long Beach Independent:
http://tinyurl.com/nzojb3

richjr37
richjr37 on October 20, 2009 at 11:22 pm

I went to Pacific Boulevard Elementary School in the early ‘70s and this theatre was on the route to and from school.

So were the California and Park theatres.

MagicLantern
MagicLantern on June 22, 2010 at 3:10 pm

The building looks like it’s still standing – on GoogleMaps you can clearly see where the roll-up door was the entrance.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on August 7, 2010 at 3:53 am

Southwest Builder & Contractor of May 27, 1921, said that the plans for this theater were being prepared by Walnut Park architect A.H. McCulloh.

William
William on August 7, 2010 at 6:17 am

Yes, it looks like the building is still standing from the overhead shots of the building.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on March 3, 2014 at 3:13 pm

The June 22 article that OCRon uploaded confirms A. H. McCulloh as the architect of the Lyric Theatre. The June 25 article says that the theater was decorated in the Egyptian style, but also says that the Lyric was a “copy” of Grauman’s Million Dollar, and that house was not Egyptian at all.

The unusual spelling of the architect’s surname, McCulloh, appears to be correct, as it is spelled that way in several trade journal items from 1921 and 1922. I can find only one instance of a Los Angeles architect called A. H. McCollough, that being from 1913, and that might not even be the same guy.

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