New Yorker Theatre

2409 Broadway,
New York, NY 10024

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Showing 1 - 25 of 52 comments

randytheicon
randytheicon on June 17, 2013 at 4:19 pm

“Rocky Horror” played there in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and at one time had one of the country’s longest-running engagements of the movie. The official NYC “shadowcast” performed there briefly in early 1978 after the Waverly in the Village stopped showing the movie; however, the New Yorker’s “uptown clientele” weren’t as supportive as the Village fans. The New Yorker also hosted an ongoing run of “Shock Treatment,” the sequel to “Rocky Horror,” after its opening in late 1981. The re-release of “Mary Poppins” was in summer 1980, and the movie hasn’t had a general reissue since then.

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on February 13, 2013 at 2:09 pm

It was twinned in 1979 by Walter Reade. I suspect the 150 seat balcony became a screen.

Mikeoaklandpark
Mikeoaklandpark on February 13, 2013 at 1:04 pm

I went there one time in 1982 to see the re release of Mary Poppins and it was a twin than.

markp
markp on February 13, 2013 at 12:55 pm

Just curious why the top header has it listed as 1 screen but the last photo in the photo section shows a picture that says A Walter Reade Twin Theatre. When was it twinned and how? Down the middle etc??

Rickort
Rickort on February 13, 2013 at 8:56 am

2 newly found photos taken in front of this theatre to add…

http://www.thelmagazine.com/imager/b/magnum/2243536/4592/sarris-hitch-new-yorker.jpg A. Sarris and Hitchcock

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2013/02/03/nyregion/03COVER/03COVER-articleLarge.jpg Ed Koch in 77

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on September 5, 2011 at 12:28 pm

Can’t really make it out completely, but it reads something like “Closed visit our market at” such-and-such street “and Broadway” (the R in Broadway is missing from the marquee). Can’t make out the first two words on the last line of the marquee, but the line ends with “to the area.”

robboehm
robboehm on September 4, 2011 at 7:23 pm

Thanks for the info. How bizarre. I couldn’t make out what was on the marquee but it didn’t look movie related.

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on September 4, 2011 at 5:24 am

Hey robboehm… The Japanese Garden was located several blocks to the north of the New Yorker, near 96th Street, and would not be visible in the shot above. The marquee you are looking at belonged to the former Stoddard Theatre, which had been closed and converted into the Garden Supermarket in the 1950’s. It was located on the next block to the north of the New Yorker, between West 89th and West 90th Streets.

robboehm
robboehm on September 4, 2011 at 4:03 am

In the background of the picture is the marquee of the Garden. Would this have been the Japanese Garden on CT or a theatre not on the site. I reviewed all the theatres named Garden. The Japanese Garden was on upper Broadway and the only possible match.

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on February 25, 2010 at 9:44 am

Closed in May 1985 after a run of “JUST OF THE GUYS” and “A PASSAGE TO INDIA”.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on February 6, 2010 at 1:45 pm

For those in the NYC area, Toby Talbot’s recent hardcover book about the New Yorker and other Talbot theatres can be found for only $12.50 at Strand Books at 828 Broadway (corner of 12th Street). Today, I spotted a substantial stock of what are probably “review copies” in both the film and New York City sections of the store. The book’s list price is $25.00.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on January 12, 2010 at 6:31 am

“Pull My Daisy” was/is a B&W “short” running about 28 minutes, and thus not considered a feature.

CSWalczak
CSWalczak on January 12, 2010 at 12:25 am

This page has a 1959 magenta-tinted picture of The New Yorker’s marquee showing a triple-feature: View link

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on December 7, 2009 at 10:27 am

One of the best things about Toby Talbot’s book is a section reproducing numerous pages from the New Yorker’s business ledger, including film rentals, ad-pub expenses, and boxoffice takings. It even inlcudes the final booking for the Yorktown Theatre in March, 1960, which was a three-day subsequent-run engagement of “The Great Man” & “Face in the Crowd” that grossed a total of $1,036.50. The theatre then clossd for a day for refurbishing and opened as the New Yorker on March 17th with Olivier’s “Henry V” and “Red Balloon,” which grossed $7,048.93 in its first week, meriting a hold-over. A note in the book says that the entire ledger can be viewed on the Internet, but so far that is not possible: www.cup.columbia.edu/talbot

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on October 15, 2009 at 5:35 pm

New book on Talbot theatres.

View link

neuroted
neuroted on September 14, 2009 at 12:31 pm

Thanks. I also just remembered that they actually twinned the theater at some point. Remember it as a pretty slapdash job, like they just put in a wall dividing the auditorium and the seats, which were not realigned. At least, that’s how I remember it.

Mikeoaklandpark
Mikeoaklandpark on September 14, 2009 at 11:01 am

The theatre closed sometime in the 80’s. I saw a re release of mary poppins there in 1982.

neuroted
neuroted on September 14, 2009 at 10:49 am

When did the New Yorker Theatre close? An exhibit of hand-lettered posters for films that played there is currently on display in the gallery off the lobby of the Walter Reade Theater at Lincoln Center. According to that, the New Yorker ran from 1960 to 1973. This has to be wrong. I moved to NYC in January 1977, and attended many films at the New Yorker for several years. Could they have meant 1983?

garisongs
garisongs on April 8, 2009 at 12:03 pm

I actually own the Coming Attractions art deco glass side piece of the theater. The workers were nice enough to deliver it to me!

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca on March 8, 2008 at 1:08 pm

Belated American premiere of a French and Italian film on the same 1965 program. Rouch and Fellini.

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on April 14, 2007 at 9:00 am

A “Harrison” theatre advertised in 1994 as being on 89th and Broadway. Does anyone know what venue that may have been?

newman
newman on February 11, 2007 at 11:03 am

Can anyone tell me if Elmer Gantry (1960) played at the New Yorker—or any other theater in the same Upper West Side neighborhood—in 1960?

susannewyork
susannewyork on December 28, 2006 at 3:45 pm

I worked at the New Yorker from 1974-76 as a cashier. Lots of memories…lots of stories. Glad I’m not the only one who remembers it!

jack4c
jack4c on January 15, 2006 at 1:55 am

In the 80s it played the Rocky Horror Show at midnight on weekends, with a couple of comic shorts as intro. The “Savannah” co-op now stands on the property.