New Yorker Theatre

2409 Broadway,
New York, NY 10024

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Viewing: Photo | Street View

Originally opened as the Adelphi Theatre, and later called the Yorktown Theatre, this was the neighborhood theater to go to on the upper west side. “I worked there in concessions and box office as a teenager”.

Woody Allen filmed one of his movies within the lobby. It was a great revival theater showing plenty of Marx Brothers films and other wonderful artists. It had a sign in book inside, to which many patrons complained about the projector, etc.

The Walter Reade Organization took it over, and they twinned the theatre in 1979. Sadly it was downhill from there and the upper west side lost another gem.

During an awful storm, the Art Deco relief of Diana the Huntress, which hung over the marquee, toppled over and remained on top of the marquee until the theater was finally demolished in the late-1970’s or so.

Contributed by Jean

Recent comments (view all 53 comments)

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on January 16, 2011 at 5:47 pm

‘Frankly, we hope to make money’

Opening for the Talbot New Yorker in 1960;

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robboehm
robboehm on September 4, 2011 at 7:03 am

In the background of the picture is the marquee of the Garden. Would this have been the Japanese Garden on CT or a theatre not on the site. I reviewed all the theatres named Garden. The Japanese Garden was on upper Broadway and the only possible match.

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on September 4, 2011 at 8:24 am

Hey robboehm… The Japanese Garden was located several blocks to the north of the New Yorker, near 96th Street, and would not be visible in the shot above. The marquee you are looking at belonged to the former Stoddard Theatre, which had been closed and converted into the Garden Supermarket in the 1950’s. It was located on the next block to the north of the New Yorker, between West 89th and West 90th Streets.

robboehm
robboehm on September 4, 2011 at 10:23 pm

Thanks for the info. How bizarre. I couldn’t make out what was on the marquee but it didn’t look movie related.

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on September 5, 2011 at 3:28 pm

Can’t really make it out completely, but it reads something like “Closed visit our market at” such-and-such street “and Broadway” (the R in Broadway is missing from the marquee). Can’t make out the first two words on the last line of the marquee, but the line ends with “to the area.”

Rickort
Rickort on February 13, 2013 at 11:56 am

2 newly found photos taken in front of this theatre to add…

http://www.thelmagazine.com/imager/b/magnum/2243536/4592/sarris-hitch-new-yorker.jpg A. Sarris and Hitchcock

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2013/02/03/nyregion/03COVER/03COVER-articleLarge.jpg Ed Koch in 77

markp
markp on February 13, 2013 at 3:55 pm

Just curious why the top header has it listed as 1 screen but the last photo in the photo section shows a picture that says A Walter Reade Twin Theatre. When was it twinned and how? Down the middle etc??

Mikeoaklandpark
Mikeoaklandpark on February 13, 2013 at 4:04 pm

I went there one time in 1982 to see the re release of Mary Poppins and it was a twin than.

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on February 13, 2013 at 5:09 pm

It was twinned in 1979 by Walter Reade. I suspect the 150 seat balcony became a screen.

randytheicon
randytheicon on June 17, 2013 at 7:19 pm

“Rocky Horror” played there in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and at one time had one of the country’s longest-running engagements of the movie. The official NYC “shadowcast” performed there briefly in early 1978 after the Waverly in the Village stopped showing the movie; however, the New Yorker’s “uptown clientele” weren’t as supportive as the Village fans. The New Yorker also hosted an ongoing run of “Shock Treatment,” the sequel to “Rocky Horror,” after its opening in late 1981. The re-release of “Mary Poppins” was in summer 1980, and the movie hasn’t had a general reissue since then.

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