Madrid Theatre

3810 Main Street,
Kansas City, MO 64111

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Madrid Theatre Kansas City, Mo.

Viewing: Photo | Street View

The Madrid Theatre was designed in Spanish style inside and out. The interior featured ornate plaster and the ceiling featured many large ornate angel medallions. The exterior looked much as it does today, yellow brick with terra cotta details and stained glass.

The theatre was constructed in 1925 and opened to the public on May 29, 1926 seating approximately 1,500. The Madrid Theatre was built and owned by the McCormick Construction Company and leased/operated by George Trinastich.

In the 1930’s, Howard Hughes, billionaire owner of RKO Pictures, bought up many theatres across the US, including the Madrid Theatre and the Warwick Theatre, just over a block away. After a decade, the Madrid Theatre closed as a movie house in 1944.

The Madrid Theatre sat unused until the early-1950’s when sadly it was purchased and gutted. The floor was leveled and it became a warehouse.

Saving the building from the wrecking ball, in 1983 craftsman Victor Patti bought the Madrid Theatre with the intention of restoring it to its grandeur. In the meantime, Patti used the building as his wood shop. In the fall of 1995, a group of investors dedicated themselves to the restoration of the Madrid Theatre.

The Madrid Theatre was beautifully restored and again opened its doors in the summer of 2001. Though few original architectural and decorative elements remain, be sure to look at the ceiling for the beautiful angels.

Today, the Madrid Theatre is often used for concerts, wedding receptions and salsa dancing.

Contributed by Clay Jarratt

Recent comments (view all 11 comments)

gohomekansas
gohomekansas on July 27, 2005 at 6:36 pm

I went to see a concert there and the sound system in really bad. I had the hardest time of finding a parking space. It’s scary in that part of the city of Kansas City. The street people was asking me for money. It was an awful night. I won’t be going down or up there again.

RobbKCity
RobbKCity on January 3, 2006 at 3:02 am

I can’t see how the Madrid seated 1500 people in 1926 if the linked photo is a representation of its capacity. It doesn’t look like it had more than 700 seats in the theatre.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on January 3, 2006 at 7:34 am

1500 seats does seem excessive, but 700 is too few. I count 31 seats across the auditorium in most of the last eleven rows (the loge section), and there are probably three more seats in most of the 18 or 19 rows (it’s difficult to count the most distant rows, the picture being too small) beyond the loge section. So there are a bit over 900 seats visible on the orchestra floor, and the picture appears to have been taken from the lower part of another section of seating (perhaps stadium style) at the rear of the house. There could be perhaps another three hundred or so seats, unseen behind the camera’s position. The ceiling doesn’t look high enough for a true balcony to be back there, so it’s probably just a few rows of seats on risers. I doubt that the total could have been much over 1200 seats, though.

RobbKCity
RobbKCity on August 1, 2006 at 8:50 pm

Yes, the Madrid does have an upper balcony, and it appears the original design did have additional seats along the sides.

Here are links to some photos taken after the renovation.

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Here is the front facade and entrance:

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The lobby:

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The fountain in the lobby:

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Stairs to the upper lobby:

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Upper lobby:

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longislandmovies
longislandmovies on April 12, 2007 at 1:55 pm

Theater for sale 2.2million

BrianBrian
BrianBrian on April 19, 2008 at 11:44 pm

Its for sale because Karl Schimell, owner of Madrid Theatre can’t get a liquor license besides having a lack of parking.
He has also heard that lightrail will be coming down Main Street (in about another 8 years) which for any business is bad news unless your James B. Nutter.
Karl Schimell is very unhappy with the new catering ordinance since he can’t have his salsa every Friday night.
Whoever buys the theatre will have to deal with the neighborhood association.

Just think. The neighborhood told him it was a very, very bad idea to renovate the theatre. I guess they were right.

spectrum
spectrum on November 25, 2010 at 10:04 pm

New webpage address is www.madridtheatre.com They have some photos – looks like some architectural details survived, still has a horseshoe balcony, and a proscenium arch (although devoid of ornamentation)

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on January 24, 2012 at 5:36 am

The June 5, 1926, issue of The Reel Journal said that the new Madrid Theatre in Kansas City had been designed by the architectural firm of DeFoe & Besecke (Victor DeFoe and Walter A. Besecke.)

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on August 20, 2012 at 12:58 pm

Described in this 1926 trade article: Boxoffice

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