Openings

  • September 20, 2004

    Restored San Jose Fox and Stockton Fox Theaters Reopen This Week.

    SAN JOSE/STOCKTON, CA — Both the San Jose Fox California Theatre (now called the California Theatre) and the Stockton Fox Theatre (renamed the Bob Hope Theate) reopen this week. According to The San Jose Business Journal, San Jose spent $75 million to restore the California while Stockton spent $5 million.

    Related articles:

    The Hope Springs Eternal
    California Theater Opens in SJ This Weekend
    San Jose Landmark Set to Reopen to Crowds
    New Name, New Polish Give New Life To An Old Theater In Stockton

  • September 16, 2004

    Adelphi Opening Its Doors Again!

    CHICAGO, IL — The Adelphi Theater is opening its doors once again to bring you back to the days when you were a child looking in.

    With the anticipation of opening this year, we are working hard around the clock fixing up the inside and giving it the attention it deserves!

    The Adelphi is coming along great, but we need your help! People are needed to help us whip the the Adelphi into shape. If you can provide ANY help at all, and want to see the Adelphi come back to life, email us at to get more information.

  • September 13, 2004

    Cinema City Closes After 31 Years

    HARTFORD, CT — The four-screen arthouse Cinema City has shut down after 31 years in business, according to a report from the Hartford Courant.

    Northeast Cinemas acquired the theater from Hoyts in 2003 and had been running it since. The theater was quite shabby and had not been updated or renovated for many years – quite possibly since it opened in 1973.

    However, it played art movies that cannot be seen anywhere else in the state of Connecticut. It will be sorely missed.

  • Princess Twin Opening

    WATERLOO, ON — John Tutt, owner of the Princess Cinema, has given a tentative date of mid-October for the opening of his new two-screen cinema at 46 King St. N.

    Tutt spent $1.6 million to buy an old furniture store in the heart of downtown Waterloo, and transformed it into the Princess Twin Cinemas.

    The Princess Cinema has operated for 19 years in the back of the Huether Hotel, a 162-year-old heritage building at the corner of Princess and King streets.

  • August 12, 2004

    Odeon Manchester Set to Close on Sept 2

    MANCHESTER, ENGLAND — The final credits will roll at Manchester’s famous Odeon Cinema next month.

    The historic 74-year-old Oxford Street picture house, which began life as the Paramount Theatre, has been unable to compete with modern cinema complexes, and a recent review determined the seven-screen cinema is no longer “commercially viable”.

    As a spokesman for the Odeon put it: “We can confirm the closure of the cinema on Oxford Street, which will officially shut its doors for the last time on Thursday, September 2. Until that time, the cinema will remain open for business as usual.

    For more information, read this report from the Manchester Online.

  • July 20, 2004

    Chicago’s Biograph Theater Sold; Movies to Depart

    CHICAGO, IL — The Biograph Theatre, long a Chicago movie-going landmark, will close to moviegoers in September of this year, after being sold to the Tony-award winning Victory Gardens Theatre. (More info details in this report from the Chicago Tribune.)

    While its interior will be gutted, the facade will be preserved. The theater company plans two theater spaces, one will be a 299-seat main stage and the other will be a more intimate 130-seat studio theater.

    While this may be a good outcome for the Biograph, it represents the loss of yet another neighborhood theater in Chicago Without a car, it becomes evermore difficult to catch a show in the city.

  • July 16, 2004

    Fine Arts Cinema Officially Dead

    BERKELEY, CA — Theatergoers of Berkeley, CA and the East Bay recently suffered the end of an era of repertory cinema when the Fine Arts Cinema was officially declared dead.

    Patrick Kennedy, owner and developer of the apartment and commercial complex being completed on the cinema’s former site, said that the last operator, Keith Arnold, had informed him that he had given up on reopening in the building bearing its name because he had been unable to raise the $800,000 to $1.2 million necessary to outfit the unfinished space offered by Kennedy.

  • July 13, 2004

    De Uitkijk In Amsterdam About To Close

    AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS — The first and oldest art house theater in The Netherlands, “De Uitkijk”, is about to close. The tiny theater on the Prinsengracht 452 has been running since 1929, but now faces a final shut-down after a couple of years of loss.

    Currently there aren’t any cinema chains or owners looking into saving the site, nor does the local government seem to care. The Filmmuseum has shown interest (since it’s roots lie in the theater), but have no money at all. The current owner is still looking for financial aid to keep the theater open.

  • Arts Cinema Opening Within Historic Art Deco London Landmark

    From press release:

    “Picturehouse Cinemas, operators of London’s favourite neighbourhood cinemas (Living London Awards as voted by LBC 97.3FM listeners ), announce the opening of their 19th venue The Olympia Cinema, located within the Olympia Exhibition complex in Kensington.

    The cinema opens to the public on Friday July 23rd, and for the opening weekend all tickets to all films will be just £1 and there are also free previews of summer blockbusters, details of how to get tickets are available from the website www.picturehouses.co.uk.

  • July 11, 2004

    Parkway Theater Closed

    Minneapolis, MN — Bill Irvine, the owner of the Parkway Theater, has closed the doors after 29 years in operation, according to an article in the Pulse of the Twin Cities. Citing rising property taxes and the ongoing struggle of independent theaters as the reason for the closing, there is now a ‘For Sale’ sign on the building.