The latest movie theater news and updates

  • January 12, 2006

    Grant Programs For Historic Theatres

    Once again a New Year has arrived, and as we go into the new year, a new opportunity for fresh grant money to restore your historical theater will become available, begining in January of 2006. Grants are available for preservation and/or conservation work on nationally significant intellectual and cultural artifacts and nationally significant historic structures and sites that include historical theaters.

    Grants are awarded through a competitive process and require a dollar non-federal match, which can be cash, donated services, or use of equipment. The grant and the non-federal match must be expended during the grant period (generally 2 to 3 years) to execute your theater restoration project. The minimum grant request for historic property projects is $250,000 federal share. The maximum grant request for all projects is $1 million federal share. The Grants Panel may, at its discretion, award less than the minimum grant request.

    As a Performing Art Centers Of Indiana client, one of their consultants will set up an appointment with your organization, to discuss the 2006 application grants package process and determine if your organization qualifies under the grants criteria guidelines. Their consulting firm will then assist you with the application grants package and help determine your organizations financial and restoration budget needs, for your project. To get started today, log onto their web site at www.onstagein.com to get your grants package and application process, implemented !

  • Sound Panels of Various sizes

    20 to 30 Sound Panels for sale, have photos to email if interested. $50 each and have varies sizes available. 3' wide to 4' wide and from 4' high to 7' high, and are insulated with insulation and can be recovered with any fabric. Will sell at a discount if you purchase 20 or more. contact Carl at 480-987-9801 or email Must sell to make room for other items.

  • January 11, 2006

    Regent Theater for SALE!!

    Regent Theater fully renovated in 2003. Current capacity as a dinner theater is 250. Movie projector and equipment still intact and functional. We also still have the theater seats. Please email for more information: . The Regent is located in Wellington, Kansas. Lots of resturant equipment available for sale as well.

  • ATTN: Dual-strip 3-D Theaters

    To those of you who have a theater who meet the following specifications, please contact me at (remove the famous director’s name):

    A theater that has run or has the capability of running dual-strip Tri-dimension films. This means having two sychronized projectors capable of loading 6000', a silver screen (doesn’t have to be stationary), capable projectionist, etc.

    The information is needed for an upcoming article about 3-D movies and a free plug will be given to those who participate.

  • January 10, 2006

    “No More Joy” Documentary Available on DVD

    The following press release was sent by producer A. J. Roquevert:

    “The documentary "No More Joy” – The Rise and Fall of New Orleans' Movie Theatres is now available on DVD. “No More Joy” is a wonderful documentary about the history of movie theatres in New Orleans.

    Centered around the closing of the Joy on Canal Street back in 2003, Rene' Brunet, the oldest living exhibitor of New Orleans reminisces of the days when there was a theatre in every neighborhood. The film brings out how social changes, technology, and the distribution of films contributed to the rise and fall of movie theatres in New Orleans. With interviews from others in the movie industry, personal picture collections and articles from exhibitors and The Times Picayune, the story is told from the beginning to the present.

    The film was completed in 2004 before hurricane Katrina struck. Please visit www.nomorejoy.com for reviews and purchase. The price is $15 and the filmmakers' proceeds will go to the hurricane relief charities in the New Orleans area."

  • January 9, 2006

    Utah Theater Cancels ‘Brokeback Mountain’

    SALT LAKE CITY, UT — A Utah movie theater has decided not to show the film “Brokeback Mountain,” according to an Associated Press report. The film was supposed to open Friday at the Megaplex at Jordan Commons.

  • Yeadon Theatre Heavily Damaged In Blaze

    YEADON, PA — The 69 year-old Yeadon Theatre sustained heavy damage in a fire in the early hours of Sunday morning, January 8th according to a story in today’s Centre Daily Times. Borough Fire Chief Craig Jeffries said, “The fire was actually shooting out into the middle of the street”. The fire started in the lobby/vestibule area, and was confined to the front of the building. The cause of the blaze is under investigation.

    The John Eberson-designed Art Moderne movie theater opened in 1937 and closed in 2001. Its rear wall was demolished in 2003, but at the last moment, the theater’s demolition was halted, thanks to a campaign by preservationists who hoped that the Yeadon could be reopened one day as a performing arts venue.

    Council President Vivian Brooker Ford said the theater’s future will be discussed at a council meeting tonight. A decision on the theater’s integrity will be made once the evaluation by an engineer is completed.

    For more information, read this report.

  • January 6, 2006

    Petition to halt demolition of the RKO Keith’s

    FLUSHING, NY — Our friend, Thomas Stathes (Tom S.), has organized a petition to save one of the historically & architecturally most important theaters; the RKO Keith’s Theatre in its entirety.

    The theater is located at 129-43 Northern Blvd, Flushing, N.Y. The current owner, Boymelgreen, plans to only save the landmarked lobby, & demolish at least 95% of the cherishable theater, for a glass curtain to view the lobby and a glass multi-use high-rise. I urge everyone “Nationwide” to sign the RKO Keith petition, & show your support, since time is of the essence! In addition, please forward the petition link to as many contacts as possible:

    http://www.petitiononline.com/rkokeith/petition.html

    We believe it is of utmost importance to: 1.Fully restore & rebuild ALL architectural features which make the RKO Keith a distinguishable famed theater (Facade, auditorium, lobby, etc); 2.Encourage developer Boymelgreen to compromise by building above the RKO Keith, which will leave the base as it was always meant to be. The Keith was already built once, & there is adequate funding, so there’s no reason why it can’t be preserved/restored in its entirety, to respect its significance & grandeur; 3.Let the public be heard, and factor in the concerns of the majority; 4.The Landmarks Preservation Commission should landmark the RKO Keith’s, & work with Boymelgreen closely.

  • Wanted: theater for lease

    Looking for a small 1-3 screen theater to lease.

    Theater must be currently open or able to re-open without any serious work done. Theater should be in or around a med to large size town with a population of 100,000 or more.

    If you have an unprofitable theater, plan to retire, or have a tenant that can not pay the rent or is on the verge of closing down, we are interested.

  • January 5, 2006

    Slate on the ‘Popcorn Palace economy’

    In a new article on Slate, Edward Jay Epstein looks into the economics of the exhibition business.

    While most of you are probably aware that theaters make much of their profits from the concession stand, there’s plenty in this article you might not have thought about before.

    Once upon a time, movie studios and movie theaters were in the same business. The studios made films for theater chains that they either owned or controlled, and they harvested almost all their revenue from ticket sales. Then, in 1948, the government forced the studios to divest themselves of the theaters. Nowadays, the two are in very different businesses. Theater chains, in fact, are in three different businesses.

    First, they are in the fast-food business, selling popcorn, soda, and other snacks. This is an extremely profitable operation in which the theaters do not split the proceeds with the studios (as they do with ticket sales). Popcorn, for example, because of the immense amount of popped bulk produced from a relatively small amount of kernels—the ratio is as high as 60:1—yields more than 90 cents of profit on every dollar of popcorn sold. It also serves to make customers thirsty for sodas, another high-margin product (supplied to most theater chains by Coca-Cola, which makes lucrative deals with theater owners in return for their exclusive “pouring” of its products). One theater chain executive went so far as to describe the cup holder mounted on each seat, which allows customers to park their soda while returning to the concession stand for more popcorn, as “the most important technological innovation since sound.” He also credited the extra salt added into the buttery topping on popcorn as the “secret” to extending the popcorn-soda-popcorn cycle throughout the movie. For this type of business, theater owners don’t benefit from movies with gripping or complex plots, since that would keep potential popcorn customers in their seats. “We are really in the business of people moving,” Thomas W. Stephenson Jr., who then headed Hollywood Theaters, told me. “The more people we move past the popcorn, the more money we make.”