The latest movie theater news and updates

  • April 7, 2017

    East Lansing, MI – Once home to two movie theaters, E.L. has gone decades without one

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    From The State News: This June will be the 30th anniversary of the closing of East Lansing’s last movie theater, the Campus Theatre, whose lobby once sat at the Grand River Avenue location that is now the textbook section of the Student Book Store.

    Student Book Store assistant manager Mike Wylie grew up in the Lansing area, and he fondly remembered seeing movies like “Thunderball” at the Campus Theatre as a child.

    “I (grew up) in a neighborhood with a lot of kids,” Wylie said. “You rode your bicycle down here and went to a movie.”

    It has been nearly three decades, though, since anyone has ridden their bike to a movie on Grand River Avenue.

    Until the 1980s, downtown East Lansing had two movie theaters: the Campus Theatre and The State Theatre, which hosted films and sometimes live performances. When MSU alumnus and Curious Book Shop owner Ray Walsh was at MSU in the 1960s and ‘70s, he said he saw films at both theaters.

  • April 4, 2017

    San Antonio, TX – City Renovation Plans For Historic Alameda Theater May Include Texas Public Radio

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    From tpr.org: As early as next year, the City of San Antonio could begin a major renovation of the historic Alameda Theater located downtown.

    The Alameda, built in 1949, was once the largest theater for Spanish-language performing arts in the United States. It has been mostly vacant for several decades but was purchased by the city in 1994. City plans call for reopening the Alameda as a Latino-focused performing arts venue.

    Assistant City Manager Lori Houston told council members that the renovation includes construction of a large stage and up to 1,500 seats.

    “The way performances are done today is a little bit different, so we’ve talked about doing a thrust stage where audiences can have a more intimate setting when they’re watching a performance. The theater has great bones. We really need to focus on that finish out to include also improving the stage, doing better seating, and also restoring the art amenities that are already in there.”

  • Lansing, MI – Movie theaters we miss

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    From the Lansing State Journal: Known to most as The Michigan Theatre and Arcade, one of the grandest theaters in the state opened as The Strand Theatre in 1921 on South Washington Avenue.

    Originally intended for vaudeville and live events, it was designed with a long arcade that included two levels of shops. The cost was a then-outrageous $500,000.

    The theater started showing films in the 1920s. Ravaged by fire in the 1930s and partly razed in 1983, it’s now known as The Atrium Office Center. What’s left of the tiered balcony is still visible on the building’s east side.

    Other Lansing theaters included The Gladmer Theatre, The Bijou Theater, The Capitol Theatre, Colonial Theater, Empress Theater, Garden Theater, Orpheum Theater, Plaza Theater, Avenue Theater and the Theatorium.

    East Lansing’s State Theatre, at 215 Abbott Road, came along in 1927 and had 800 seats. The Campus Theatre, at 407 E. Grand River Ave., East Lansing was built in 1950 and seated 1,500.

  • March 28, 2017

    Carthage, MO – Historic 66 Drive-In Theatre in Carthage combines American love of cars, movies

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    From The Joplin Globe: When the 66 Drive-In Theatre — one of the few today with roots on the route — opens Friday, it will be in the care of new owners for the first time in more than three decades.

    Tourists who today come from around the world to experience America’s Route 66 history are joined at the theater by locals, many of whom have early memories of the drive-ins that once dotted the region.

    As a girl, Amanda Pearish-Rinehart spent weekends going to drive-in theaters with her family, and she said supporting the Carthage theater seems like the right thing to do.

    Plus, it’s fun.

    “I spend about half of what I spend to take them to a regular theater, and we have a much better time,” she said.

    Nathan McDonald didn’t grow up around drive-in theaters, but he said they got into his bloodstream during his 10 years of working at the 66 Drive-In as a security guard.

  • Denver, CO – Landmark sells Olde Town Arvada movie theater

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    From the Denver Business Journal: Los Angeles-based Landmark Theatres is selling its Olde Town Arvada 14 Theatre on April 2.

    A spokeswoman from the company wrote in an email: “As of April 2nd the theatre will be closed. As of Thursday, April 6, the Olde Town will be in the hands of new owners. Thank you for your years of patronage.”

  • March 24, 2017

    Las Vegas, NV – Assembly Democrats want to save historic Huntridge Theater in Las Vegas

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    From the Las Vegas Review-Journal: Two Nevada Assembly members want to take another stab at saving the Huntridge Theater in Las Vegas.

    Democrats Heidi Swank and Elliot Anderson of Las Vegas introduced a bill Monday seeking $3 million for the Division of State Lands to purchase the shuttered theater near downtown Las Vegas.

  • Brooklyn, NY – Bed-Stuy’s historic Slave Theater has been torn down

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    From Curbed NY: Bed-Stuy’s Slave Theater, a nexus of black culture from 1984 to 1998 and the birthplace of a new wave of political activism in a time of heightened race relations in NYC, is no more. Brownstoner swung by to find that the historic building at 1215 Fulton Avenue, between Bedford and Nostrand streets, has been completely demolished. In its heyday, the theater was a gathering place for rallies lead by the Reverend Al Sharpton, who credited the talks with shifting the center of New York’s civil rights movement from Harlem to Brooklyn in a 2012 Times article. Now cleared, the site is awaiting its future as a mixed-use building developed by Industrie Capital Partners.

    Although the Slave shuttered in 1998, its demise began a decade later following the death of its proprietor, Judge John L. Phillips Jr.. The theater became embroiled in a dramatic ownership dispute with allegations of elder abuse, back taxes, and politically-motivated revenge. The property was poised to hit the foreclosure auction block in July 2012, prompting local theater group New Brooklyn Theatre’s attempt to crowdfund the Slave back into existence.

  • Alton, IL – Alton plans to demolish local movie theater

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    From KSDK.com: A long-abandoned movie theater in the Metro East may soon be facing the wrecking ball.

    Alton Cine, a 300-seat cinema located off of Homers Adam Parkway in Alton, Ill., closed its doors for good in 1998. But despite the 19-year closure, city leaders hope to tear down what locals consider to be an eyesore.

    The announcement was initially made during a mayoral candidate forum earlier this month.

    According to Alton Mayor Brant Walker, a private owner has maintained the property that has sat in disrepair for nearly two decades. The cinema has remained in poor conditions both inside and out, including the roof reportedly falling in on itself.

    Mayor Walker said the city plans to assess the building for asbestos. Once the asbestos is removed, the building reportedly won’t take long to level out. He did not give an exact date for demolition.

    Mayor Walker said he believed ‘Titanic’ was the last showing at Alton Cine.

  • Fort Worth, TX – Downtown’s hidden theater awaits a restoration angel

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    From the Star-Telegram:
    The last outpost of downtown Fort Worth’s movie house “Show Row” may yet make a comeback.

    But the new owners of the Hollywood Theater, closed 40 years, are not yet ready to say much about plans to lease the space for potential restoration to its 1930s showbiz glory.

    Another hint of the Hollywood’s possible return appeared this week, when the unsigned social media account Urban Fort Worth posted photos of the theater’s dusty remnants.

    The theater is next door to the Historic Electric Building Apartments on West Seventh Street. The lobby and facade were converted to retail space in 1979, and the lower floor was paved for apartment parking.

    But the top half of the theater remains: two upper balconies, the upper concourse and most of the decorated screen.

    The new Houston-based owner, Tradewind Properties, is advertising the space for lease. Property manager Amber Frisbie said Thursday that the idea is “very preliminary” and Tradewind President James Rastello isn’t ready to discuss it.

  • James Island, SC – James Island movie theater closes abruptly for good

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    From Live5News.com: One of James Island’s oldest movie theaters is closed to the public for good, according to the Assistant Manager of the theater.

    Carmike James Island 8 located off Central Park Road showed its last films to movie goers Thursday night.

    “We got the info that yesterday was our last day,” said the assistant manager who identified himself as Charles.

    According to the Carmike theater website, which is a subsidy of AMC theaters, there are no show times listed for the theater this weekend. Show times on Fandango are not listed either.

    “There was a lot of background chaos that went on,” Charles said.

    City of Charleston documents show the property was sold to a developer to build a multi-family apartment complex.

    At a Design Review Board meeting earlier this month, the renderings were denied based on comments from the board regarding building placement and setback from Central Park Road and Up on the Hill Road.

    Messages for comment from AMC Theaters management was not immediately returned.