Comments from Joe Vogel

Showing 226 - 250 of 8,882 comments

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Roxy Theatre on Jun 9, 2014 at 10:46 am

I should have noted in my previous comment that the Ridge Theatre and was renamed the Glen Theatre in 1968.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Roxy Theatre on Jun 8, 2014 at 11:57 am

The January 4, 1941, issue of Showman’s Trade Review reported that James and Peter Bikos, operators of the Roxy Theatre, were contemplating a new theater to be built at Broadway and 39th Avenue. I don’t believe the project was carried out, but later that year V. U. Young began construction on the Ridge Theatre, located around the corner from the Roxy.

Additional research has revealed that James and Peter Bikos were cousins, not brothers, but Peter Bikos' brothers Dan and Nick also operated theaters in Gary.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Roosevelt Theatre on Jun 8, 2014 at 11:49 am

The Roosevelt Theatre was operated by the Nick Bikos Theatre Company. Nick Bikos was involved in movie exhibition it Gary at least as early as 1919 and was operating the Roosevelt at least as early as 1932.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Tolleston Theatre on Jun 8, 2014 at 11:29 am

The correct spelling of the theater’s name is Tolleston, which is the district of Gary in which it was located.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Tolleston Theatre on Jun 8, 2014 at 11:24 am

The Tolleston Theatre was one of several Gary houses operated by the Nick Bikos Theatre Company. Other houses in the local chain included the Roosevelt, Indiana, and Fifth Avenue Theatres.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Roxy Theatre on Jun 8, 2014 at 10:15 am

The February 18, 1956, issue of Boxoffice said that the Roxy Theatre was being converted into retail space.

The Roxy was one of several Gary theaters operated by the Bikos brothers.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Ohio Theater on Jun 7, 2014 at 1:12 pm

Historic Evansville says that Marble Hall was built in the early 1850s, and before it became the Ohio Theatre it had also operated as a movie house called the Riverside Theatorium. This house was mentioned in the January 14, 1911, issue of The Moving Picture World:

“The Riverside Theatorium, although a small house, is known as the house with the ‘Mirror Screen’ and is running first-class independent films. Mr. W. Huddy, the proprietor of the Theatorium, has started to renovate his house, and his plans are to follow the advice of our Construction Page by using somber colors. Mr. Huddy hopes to secure a lease on the next building and, if successful, he will double his seating capacity”
The house was also mentioned in the March 8, 1910, issue of the Goshen Democrat:
“PREVENT PANIC AT THEATER

“Doorkeepers Pacify Crowd When Department Answers False Alarm.

“Evansville, Ind., March 4—Cool headedness on the part of the doorkeepers prevented a panic in the Riverside Theatorium when the fire department was summoned on a false alarm that the picture machine in the Theatorium had exploded. One hundred persons were in the Theatorium at the time.”

The Historic Evansville page indicates that the Riverside Theatorium was operating in 1909, and that Marble Hall was remodeled into a theater in 1912. I would imagine that the Theatorium originally operated in the original hall, which was most likely upstairs, and that the 1912 remodeling moved it to the ground floor.

The page credits Manson Gilbert as the architect. I don’t think that F. Manson Gilbert was around when the building was built in the 1850s, so he must have been the one who designed the 1912 remodeling. This might also have been when the building lost the third floor that is seen in the earlier photos of it.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Loew's Majestic Theatre on Jun 7, 2014 at 11:04 am

The May 17, 1919, issue of Electrical Review said that the New Majestic Theatre in Evansville was to undergo a remodeling that would cost between $50,000 and $75,000. The Evansville architectural firm Harry E. Boyle & Co. was providing the plans.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theater on Jun 7, 2014 at 7:01 am

I noticed a “Contact” link at the bottom of each page of the IHS web site, but my e-mail isn’t working right now and won’t be until I get a new computer set up, so I can’t contact them. Even if I could, I’m not sure they’d fix errors. I contacted the Los Angeles Public Library about several errors in their photo collection several years ago, and the errors are still there.

More institutions should have Flickr accounts like the Library of Congress does. The LOC has gotten a lot of useful information from people posting comments on their photos at Flickr.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Sanders Theatre on Jun 7, 2014 at 6:38 am

David you’re right. I hadn’t noticed the back of that building, which does look like an old stage house. Its modern address is 1116 Prospect, though. If that’s the Sanders Theatre building, the lots on the block must have been renumbered since the old directories were published.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Fountain Square Theatre on Jun 6, 2014 at 9:33 pm

DavidAE: For those who don’t know HTML, Cinema Treasures now supports Markdown Code, for which you need only square brackets and parentheses to embed a link in your text. Scroll down to the LINKS section of the page to see the example code. All you will need at Cinema Treasures are inline-style links, so all you have to do is put the text you want to become the link in square brackets, and then paste your copied URL between parentheses immediately following the closing bracket.

Here is the Markdown code output for the three links you posted:

Link one

Link two

Link three

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theater on Jun 6, 2014 at 2:23 pm

Lost Memory’s photo link has gone missing, but I think this is probably the same photo. The description with the photo mistakenly gives the location and history of the other Strand Theatre (the Capitol Theatre,) but the photo has to depict this house at 1330 E. Washington. The Capitol Theatre building was very different.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Fountain Square Theatre on Jun 6, 2014 at 1:57 pm

It looks to me like the entrance to the Fountain Square Theatre is at 1111 Prospect Street, not 1105 Shelby Street. The latter appears to be the address of the attached office building.

Here is the official web site. It says “[c]losed and gutted in the late 1950’s the former theatre space housed a Woolworth five and dime store, then years later a thrift shop.” The current interior is more a reinterpretation than a restoration, although the page also says that some original architectural features remain intact on the mezzanine level. The photo gallery includes one shot of the original interior, and it was quite different from what is there now.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Sanders Theatre on Jun 6, 2014 at 1:34 pm

The photo we are currently displaying depicts the Fountain Square Theatre at 1105 Prospect Street. The Sanders Theatre must have been across the street. On its site (1106-1110 Prospect) there is an old-looking brick commercial building that has “2001 A.D.” carved in its parapet, so the theater might have been demolished, unless the date denotes an extensive renovation of the building.

Polk’s 1919 Indianapolis City Directory lists the Sanders Theatre at 1106-08 Prospect Street. The 1916 directory lists it as the Quality Theater, Fred W. Sanders, Proprietor.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Tower Theatre on Jun 6, 2014 at 12:38 pm

In Polk’s 1919 Indianapolis City Directory, 20 S. Illinois Street is the address of the Rialto Theatre.

The “Among the Picture Theaters” section of the September 23, 1916, issue of The Moving Picture World ran several paragraphs about the new Rialto, several weeks after it had opened, but didn’t provide a photo:

“RIALTO THEATER, INDIANAPOLIS, IND.

“Newest of Photoplay Houses to Be Opened in This City—

“Seats 1,000 and Has $10,000 Organ—Managed by Fred B. Leonard.

“THE latest motion picture theater in Indianapolis, Ind., to throw open its doors is the Rialto, in South Illinois street, just as close to the center of the city as it is possible to get. Cars from every section of the city unload their burden of human freight at the front doors of this theater.

“The Rialto should become one of the most popular theaters of the city. It is deserving of popularity. It has a combination of beauty and comfort. The color scheme of the Rialto to begin with, is green and ivory. The walls are ivory tinted with delicate frescoing, and along the sides are baskets of green glass, filled with ferns and other greenery, so lighted that the plants appear to be growing in water. The ceiling, both of the theater itself and the entrances—there are two— are covered with a white trellis supporting quantities of, smilax. The lights are globes of a delicate green, set among the leaves; there are six hundred of these globes and the effect of the whole is cooling.

“The theater is cool. The heat of the hottest day is forgotten after one enters the long passage with the mirrors and flowing brackets along the side, which leads into the theater proper. In the lower part of the theater half a dozen big electric fans keep going constantly, while in the gallery one immense fan, measuring sixty inches across, circulates 50,000 cubic feet of cool air a minute.

“The theater seats a thousand persons- There are two stage boxes, also ornamented with white covered vine trellises, and a row of boxes at the back of the theater. In the ceiling of the gallery and in the ceiling of the lower floor big green and gold lamps are set in. The lower part of the boxes are draped with green curtains.

“One of the attractions is a $10,000 pipe organ, operated from the center of the orchestra pit. This pit also has its covering of green and white trellis and its smilax.

“The screen, of crystal gold fiber, is set far back on the stage and the out-of-doors effect is heightened by vine-draped pillars and pots of palms and other green things. Two rest rooms, one on each floor, top off the equipment of the theater.

“Fred B. Leonard, manager of the theater, announces that the fitting of the theater cost between $50,000 and $60,000. Mr. Leonard says the theater, under his management, will become one of the highest class theaters in the Middle West if effort will do this. The opening of the theater saw the Blue Bird feature, ‘Shoes.’ The Blue Bird productions will be used regularly by the management of the new theater.”

The opening of the Rialto had also been briefly noted in the August 5 issue of the same publication.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Cozy Theatre on Jun 6, 2014 at 12:20 pm

In 1916, The Indianapolis Star was listing two houses called the Palms Theatre. In addition to the one on North Illinois Street there was one at 30th Street and Highland Place.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Cozy Theatre on Jun 6, 2014 at 12:03 pm

The house at 136 N. Illinois Street was listed as the Palms Theatre in Polk’s 1919 Indianapolis City Directory.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Paramount Theatre on Jun 6, 2014 at 11:36 am

The Gayety was one of six theaters operating in Indianapolis according to Hyman’s Handbook of Indianapolis, published in 1907. The Gayety was one of the town’s two burlesque houses.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Daisy Theatre on Jun 6, 2014 at 11:17 am

I see a building at 2530 (bicycle shop) and a building at 2544-46, but there’s a parking lot in between them. Unless the addresses have been shifted, the Daisy Theatre has been demolished.

The Daisy Theatre was listed in Polk’s 1919 Indianapolis City Directory.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Emerald Theatre on Jun 6, 2014 at 10:50 am

Polk’s 1919 and 1922 Indianapolis City Directories list the Emerald Theatre at 441-43 Blake Street. Most of Blake Street has been swallowed up by the Indianapolis campus of Indiana University-Perdue University. The Emerald Theatre was advertised as being at Blake and W. Washington Streets in issues of The Indianapolis Star in 1915.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Bandbox Theatre on Jun 6, 2014 at 10:39 am

Polk’s 1919 Indianapolis City Directory lists the Crystal Theatre at 119-21 N. Illinois Avenue. The theater might have moved to a new building at some point, unless the lots were renumbered or there was an error in the directory.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Columbia Theatre on Jun 6, 2014 at 10:25 am

The Columbia Theatre was listed at 535 N. Senate Avenue in Polk’s 1919 Indianapolis City Directory.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Washington Theatre on Jun 6, 2014 at 10:18 am

The Washington Theatre at 521 Indiana Avenue was listed in Polk’s 1919 Indianapolis City Directory.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about English Theatre on Jun 6, 2014 at 9:20 am

Not surprisingly, English’s Opera House was on this list of theaters designed by J. B. McElfatrick & Son, published in 1892.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Annex Theatre on Jun 5, 2014 at 12:20 pm

The Annex Theater at 118 S. Illinois Street is listed in the 1909 Indianapolis city directory.