Comments from raybradley

Showing 651 - 675 of 740 comments

raybradley
raybradley commented about Frontier Theater on Jan 3, 2007 at 12:31 pm

For the Log Cabin (AKA-Frontier) Theater newspaper movie ads ran up to 1957.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Penn Theater on Jan 2, 2007 at 12:46 pm

If memory serves correctly, I recall that the Trend experienced a slow death. This tidy little theatre ceased regular seven day week presentations in the mid 1980’s, then opened only for weekend showings. After that it became a sporadic open and closed operation until shutting down completely in the early 1990’s.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Inca Theatre on Jan 1, 2007 at 10:22 am

Let’s see, Video Theatre’s yearly payroll would average out to $13,846.15 per theatre, and $1,396.43 per employee. Not so impressive, even for those days.
Funny thing, Video Theatres owned an interest in CBS, then was bought out by Capital Cities Com. who later controlled ABC.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Wagon Wheel Cinema on Dec 21, 2006 at 7:51 am

During the summer season the old Frontier City Opera House always staged professional vaudeville, variety, or old time melodrama shows.
Besides the standard dozen or so amusement park rides like the Ferris Wheel, bumper cars, merry-go-rounds, etc., Frontier City also had some wonderfully lavish thrill rides such as Lost River, 89er Ghost Mine, Autopia, and the flying saucer.
Souvenir shops closed during winter months, but other memorable year round stores were the Jam Cellar, Taffy Shop, Norrick Antiques, and Jim’s Gems & Rare Books.

raybradley
raybradley commented about M & M Mini Cinemas on Dec 21, 2006 at 1:52 am

I’m sorry, correct address was 2639 NW Britton Rd.

raybradley
raybradley commented about M & M Mini Cinemas on Dec 21, 2006 at 1:43 am

Actual physical address for the M&M Cinema would have been 2629 W. Britton Rd.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Boulevard Theatre on Dec 19, 2006 at 9:12 am

On the below web sites I suspect that the Boulevard and 1944 Fox Boulevard are one and the same,
View link
View link

raybradley
raybradley commented about Corral Theatre on Dec 19, 2006 at 9:08 am

Perhaps the address got transposed as the street number left of the Corral looks as if it reads 406.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Kansas Theatre on Dec 19, 2006 at 9:03 am

Most likely the old Star Nickelodeon was renamed Kansas Theatre in 1921, as the Star photo looks as if it dates much further back than the 1920’s. Here are vintage images of the Kansas Theatre,
View link
View link

raybradley
raybradley commented about Wichita Theatre on Dec 19, 2006 at 8:57 am

These web pages contains vintage images of the Wichita Theatre,
View link
View link

raybradley
raybradley commented about Meadow Lark Drive-In on Dec 19, 2006 at 8:47 am

This fun web site has vintage images of the Meadowlark,
View link

raybradley
raybradley commented about Victory Theatre on Dec 16, 2006 at 1:55 pm

This is a fun web-site devoted to Kansas classic theatre history, with lots of vintage images. It mentions the Victory;
View link

raybradley
raybradley commented about Midwest Theatre on Dec 16, 2006 at 7:26 am

Of all the atmospherics Eberson designed, the auditoriums of the OKC Midwest Theatre and the Palace Theatre in Marion, OH, most closely match each other.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Palace Theatre on Dec 16, 2006 at 7:09 am

Amoung John Eberson’s many sky jobs, he designed this theatre and the Oklahoma City Midwest Theatre (1930-1975). Although OKC’s Midwest Theatre auditorium was longer and higher, it was also much more narrow than the Palace. Otherwise these two theatre auditorium sidewalls matched one another in design.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Lyric at the Plaza on Dec 15, 2006 at 5:50 pm

Boller Bros. designed the Ottawa, KS, PLAZA Theatre, the Lawrence, KS, GRANADA Theatre, and the Oklahoma City, OK, PLAZA Theatre. Original facades on all three of these 1930’s movie houses were almost identical.
Most likely these theatre interiors did not match one another.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Plaza Grill & Cinema on Dec 15, 2006 at 5:41 pm

Boller Bros designed the Ottawa, KS, PLAZA Theatre, the Lawrence, KS, GRANADA Theatre, and the Oklahoma City, OK, PLAZA Theatre. Original facades on all three of these movie houses were very similar, almost identical.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Granada Theatre on Dec 15, 2006 at 5:28 pm

Original facades of the Lawrence, KS, GRANADA Theatre and Oklahoma City’s PLAZA Theatre are somewhat identical. Boller Bros designed both of these movie houses.
Seating capacity for each cinema was around 900, though I doubt the interiors matched as the Plaza did not have a balcony.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Crown Uptown Theatre on Dec 10, 2006 at 10:12 am

Another 1928 Boller Bros. atmospheric simular to the Uptown was the (1928-1952) Ritz Theatre in Oklahoma City, which was razed long ago.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Crawford Theatre on Dec 10, 2006 at 9:39 am

In that 1952 photo of the Crawford Theatre, does anyone know if that corner oil well was functional?

raybradley
raybradley commented about Sebastian Theater on Dec 9, 2006 at 6:37 pm

Oklahoma had two (possibly three) reverse theatres.

Two vintage types were located in Okmulgee, OK.
The Cozy Theatre on Main St. was most definitely a reverse plan. It was built within a former retail store and to conform to fire safety codes the projectors were required to be placed in a metal booth over a rear alley.
There is debate on whether or not the Inca Theatre had a reverse auditorium. Old timers report that it did. Some “newcomers” claim it didn’t. Personally I suspect that it was probably of the reverse style as it too was built inside former retail space and surely this booth would also have been placed over the alley to meet fire codes.

Oklahoma City had a 1970’s porn house called the AcademiX Adult Cinema that had a reverse auditorium. Patrons entered from either side of the screen. Both isles ran along side walls, with centered seating. The projection booth was in the rear of the building.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Sigmund Theatre on Nov 28, 2006 at 2:04 pm

Due to its corner location on Main & Broadway, the Sigmond address could be listed as One Main, or One Broadway. Both would be correct.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Love Theatre on Nov 25, 2006 at 7:05 pm

According to an Inca Theatre posting from Symco, and above comment from Ken Roe, this house was known during its life time as the Drew, Love, and Rex.
Good photos for this theatre and the Dreamland could probably be found in old yearbooks at the school library or public library.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Chief Theatre on Nov 25, 2006 at 11:34 am

Those old instant snapshots crumbled to dust long ago.
I was in my mid teens back then, and my actual intention was to ride my new motorcycle from Tulsa down to McIntosh County to take Poloroid Land pictures of Mr. Ed, the tan palomino of TV fame, who had been retired to a nearby ranch.
When I got there the ranch forman gruffly informed me that due to pesky curiousity seekers Mr. Ed had been moved to a secret location where he could graze undisturbed. So, I headed over to Eufaula’s Main Street to see what was happening. There I took minute pictures of the old Chief Theatre, and some cowboys hanging out on a street corner.
Mr. Ed died in sleep a few years later, it was then disclosed that he had spent his final years in peaceful bliss on a horse ranch in Cleveland County, OK.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Dollhouse Cinema on Nov 25, 2006 at 8:40 am

From the satellite view provided by Google maps the Dollhouse Cinema can clearly be seen on the Eastside of the town square, on S. Hudson just North of W. Broadway. Apparently the marquee is still in place, and the stagehouse is clearly visible.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Chief Theatre on Nov 25, 2006 at 8:07 am

In 1972 I was in Eufaula to photograph the closed down Chief Theatre. On the street out front of the old theatre I met a teenage cowboy by the name of Marshall Pruett who told me how the Chief Theatre had been very noisy during Saturday matinees. Seems that ranchers and their families would come to town to shop on Saturday morning, then attend an afternoon picture. Men would sit on back rows to argue politics. Wives sat in side sections to exchange recipes and news. Kids were down front screaming and yelling.
At that time, Marshall thought the old theatre had closed sometime in the mid 1960’s.