Comments from AndrewBarrett

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AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about Dream Theater on Jun 25, 2014 at 12:53 am

For future historical reference, here is the detailed description of the organ and stoplist on the Organ Historical Society database, complete with a couple of photos: http://database.organsociety.org/SingleOrganDetails.php?OrganID=24862

AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about Dream Theater on Jun 25, 2014 at 12:52 am

As of June 24th, 2014, the original Kimball theatre organ from this theatre has been listed for sale on eBay, located in Anacortes, Washington. It is a 2 manual, 5 rank Kimball, opus 6826, from 1925. I hope someone buys this organ, it appears complete except for the toy counter, and would make someone a very nice little home pipe organ. I have no connection with the seller whatsoever: http://www.ebay.com/itm/COMPLETE-PIPE-ORGAN-W-W-Kimball-Co-Opus-6826-1925-/121371359349

AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about Rockne Theatre on Jun 21, 2014 at 6:05 am

What a cool-looking building, I’m glad it’s still standing and being used for something!

According to David Junchen’s “Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Organ”, pg. 144, the Ambassador (Rockne) Theatre in Chicago originally had a 4 manual, 14 rank Geneva theatre pipe organ installed in 1925. The serial # of the organ’s blower was 17083. According to the Geneva chapter of the aforementioned book, this was one of the firm’s “show” organs and had what may have been the only 4-manual console built by the firm.

According to pg. 142 of the same book, the four-manual console from this organ was in daily use at the Elm Skating Club “as of 1983”. It turns out that through a few unfortunate events, the rink closed in the late 1980s and was torn down shortly thereafter. I do hope the console (and/or the rest of the organ, or parts of it) still exist somewhere today.

Does anybody know any more about this organ? I’m researching it for the Geneva Organs history page on my upcoming website.

Thanks!

AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about Tivoli Theatre on Jun 21, 2014 at 12:47 am

According to David Junchen’s “Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Pipe Organ”, pg. 144, the Tivoli Theatre in Aurora, Illinois originally had a 3 manual, 12 rank Geneva theatre pipe organ installed at some point (year not known or not given in the book). Does anybody know what happened to this organ and where it is today? Thanks!!!

AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about State Theatre on Jun 21, 2014 at 12:43 am

According to David Junchen’s “Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Pipe Organ” pg. 144, the State Theatre in Hartford, Connecticut originally had a Geneva theatre pipe organ, size not known or not given in the book, installed in 1926. The serial # of the organ’s blower was 19551. Does anybody know what happened to this organ and where it is today? Thanks!

AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about Roseville Theatre on Jun 21, 2014 at 12:34 am

Hello, KenRoe, according to “The Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Pipe Organ” by David Junchen, pg. 144, the Roseville Theatre originally had a 2 manual, 8 rank Geneva theatre pipe organ, installed in 1926.

As a Smith and Geneva organ enthusiast, I’d sure love to know where this organ is today, especially seeing as that its beautiful theatre is still open!

AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about Tivoli Theatre on Jun 15, 2014 at 9:11 pm

Hi folks,

Is this the “Allen Theatre” in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, in which a Hillgreen-Lane theatre pipe organ, opus 479, was installed in 1917?

I am trying to track down this instrument and its history, or at least find a few photos of it and/or a stoplist. Opus 479 was/is a two-manual, 21-rank instrument which was shipped from the Hillgreen-Lane factory in 1917 at a cost of $3,225. It featured a 3-horsepower blower, serial #8256.

Could this organ, or parts of it, be playing in a church, residence, or meeting hall somewhere today? Or has the entire organ long since been destroyed? Does anyone know?

The above information comes courtesy of Mr. David Junchen’s “Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Pipe Organ”, pages 166 and 167.

I believe this organ is probably the sister organ to opus 478, a 2-manual, 20-rank instrument, some of which (apparently) went down with the destruction of its original home, the Liberty Theatre in Youngstown, Ohio, in 2013.

I was apparently too late to save opus 478 but it may not be too late for me to save opus 479, if it still exists.

Thanks a lot!

AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about Adams Theater on Jun 15, 2014 at 2:06 am

According to Mr. David Junchen’s “Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Pipe Organ”, pgs. 165 and 167, the Adams theatre had a 3 manual, 28 rank Hillgreen-Lane theatre pipe organ (opus 518) installed in 1918, at a cost of $5,400. This organ had a 5 horsepower blower, serial #9354. Does anyone know where this organ, or its parts, are located today, or what happened to it?

AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about Verdi Theatre on Apr 25, 2014 at 4:33 am

According to “The Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Organ” by David L. Junchen, pg. 628, there was a Smith theatre pipe organ installed at the Verdi (World) Theatre in San Francisco at some point. No date or other information on the installation is given.

Does anyone know what became of this organ?
Thanks!

AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about Strand Theatre on Apr 25, 2014 at 4:31 am

According to “The Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Organ” by David L. Junchen, pg. 628, there was a two manual, seven-rank Smith theatre pipe organ installed at the Strand Theatre in San Francisco at some point. No date or further details are given.

Where is this organ (or its parts) today?

I do hope this theatre’s renovation turns out for the best, thanks!

AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about Regal Theatre on Apr 25, 2014 at 3:49 am

I do hope this building is conserved so it doesn’t become more run-down, and that this theatre is eventually restored! That would be great!

According to “The Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Organ” by David L. Junchen, pg. 628, the “Regal Theatre” (noted in the listing as “Opened as Pompeii Theatre”) had a two manual, six-rank Smith theatre pipe organ, installed in 1926.

Does anybody know what happened to this organ and where it (or its parts) are today? Are there still organ chambers in the theatre building?

Thanks!

AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about Lincoln Theatre on Apr 25, 2014 at 3:46 am

According to “The Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Organ” by David L. Junchen, pg. 628, the “Lincoln Theatre” in San Francisco had a two-manual Smith theatre pipe organ.

No other details, such as # of ranks, installation date, or blower serial # are given.

Does anybody know what happened to this organ? Thanks!

AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about Monache Theatre on Apr 25, 2014 at 3:43 am

“The Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Organ” by David L. Junchen, pg. 628, lists the Monarche Theatre as having a two manual, 10 rank Smith theatre pipe organ. This entry does not give any more details such as the installation date, blower serial #, etc.

Does anybody know what happened to this organ and where it (or its parts) are today?

Thanks!

AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about California Theatre on Apr 25, 2014 at 3:37 am

What a BEAUTIFUL theatre! Congratulations on re-opening and the ongoing restoration! I must pay this a visit when I’m in town.

“The Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Organ” by David L. Junchen lists a two manual, nine rank Smith organ as being installed in the California Theatre in Pittsburgh (sic!) California, in 1924. The blower serial number was/is 15874.

Judging from the comments on here, it appears that the Smith organ was replaced at some point by a three-manual, 10-rank Robert Morton organ which still exists and might be reinstalled in the theatre (IHope Ihope Ihope Ihope). I can hardly think of a better home for the organ, or a better organ for the theatre!

Robert-Morton organs generally get a lot more respect from theatre organ aficionados than Smith organs do, and they are high-quality instruments and deserve this respect.

Visiting organists should be satisfied with the Robert-Morton installation, if it is done well (and I hope it is done well, without ruining the instrument).

Anyway, I happen to personally really like Smith organs, and so am curious what became of the aforementioned earlier organ.

Was it a nine-rank or an 11-rank (as mentioned by wurl240 above)??? Where is it now? If broken up, where did the parts go, who has them?

Thanks a lot,
Andrew

AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about Washington Theatre on Apr 25, 2014 at 3:27 am

“The Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Organ” by David L. Junchen, page 628, lists a “Pasadena Theatre” in Pasadena, California, as having a three manual Smith theatre pipe organ.

No other details, such as # of ranks or installation date, are given.

I could not find a “Pasadena Theatre” listed on this site right now (April 2014) but the “Pasadena Photoplay Theatre” (listed on its own page) has a fairly close name. However, according to Lost Memory, this “Pasadena Photoplay Theatre” apparently had only about 350 seats, and most three-manual theatre organs had at least ten ranks.

The largest known Smith organs were both 4 manuals and 16 ranks, so that this organ in question was probably between 10 and 14 ranks, or so.

That is quite large for a little 350-seat theatre, since most theatres of this size either had a photoplayer (such as those made by American Photo Player Co, or Wurlitzer) or simply a person playing the piano, or, if an organ, nothing larger than about six or seven ranks (and thus, two manuals). Thus, I think it is unlikely that the “Pasadena Photoplay Theatre” is the same theatre mentioned in the book.

Does anybody know more about this instrument, or a larger “Pasadena Theatre?” in Pasadena?

Thanks!

NOTE: I think that the Washington Theatre is about the right size to have had such an organ, so is a possible candidate for the actual place of installation of this organ, and I’m putting this here for the time being until proven otherwise.

AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about Uptown Theatre on Apr 25, 2014 at 3:23 am

“The Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Organ” by David L. Junchen, page 628, lists a “Pasadena Theatre” in Pasadena, California, as having a three manual Smith theatre pipe organ.

No other details, such as # of ranks or installation date, are given.

I could not find a “Pasadena Theatre” listed on this site right now (April 2014) but this has a fairly close name. However, according to Lost Memory, the “Pasadena Photoplay Theatre” (listed on its own page) apparently had only about 350 seats, and most three-manual theatre organs had at least ten ranks.

The largest known Smith organs were both 4 manuals and 16 ranks, so that this organ in question was probably between 10 and 14 ranks, or so.

This is quite large for a little 350-seat theatre, since most theatres of this size either had a photoplayer (such as those made by American Photo Player Co, or Wurlitzer) or simply a person playing the piano, or, if an organ, nothing larger than about six or seven ranks (and thus, two manuals). Thus, I think it is unlikely that the aforementioned house is the same theatre mentioned in the book.

Does anybody know more about this instrument, or a larger “Pasadena Theatre?” in Pasadena?

Thanks!

NOTE: I also think the Egyptian/Uptown opened at the right time, and was probably of the right size, to have had such an organ, so I’m also putting this here for the time being.

AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about State Theatre on Apr 25, 2014 at 3:21 am

“The Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Organ” by David L. Junchen, page 628, lists a “Pasadena Theatre” in Pasadena, California, as having a three manual Smith theatre pipe organ.

No other details, such as # of ranks or installation date, are given.

I could not find a “Pasadena Theatre” listed on this site right now (April 2014) but this has a fairly close name. However, according to Lost Memory, this “Pasadena Photoplay Theatre” apparently had only about 350 seats, and most three-manual theatre organs had at least ten ranks.

The largest known Smith organs were both 4 manuals and 16 ranks, so that this organ in question was probably between 10 and 14 ranks, or so.

This is quite large for a little 350-seat theatre, since most theatres of this size either had a photoplayer (such as those made by American Photo Player Co, or Wurlitzer) or simply a person playing the piano, or, if an organ, nothing larger than about six or seven ranks (and thus, two manuals). Thus, I think it is unlikely this is the same theatre mentioned in the book.

Does anybody know more about this instrument, or a larger “Pasadena Theatre?” in Pasadena?

Thanks!

I think the State might be a good candidate, time-wise and size-wise, for having had such an organ, so am placing this here also for the time being.

AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about Pasadena Photoplay Theatre on Apr 25, 2014 at 3:20 am

“The Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Organ” by David L. Junchen, page 628, lists a “Pasadena Theatre” in Pasadena, California, as having a three manual Smith theatre pipe organ.

No other details, such as # of ranks or installation date, are given.

I could not find a “Pasadena Theatre” listed on this site right now (April 2014) but this has a fairly close name. However, according to Lost Memory, this “Pasadena Photoplay Theatre” apparently had only about 350 seats, and most three-manual theatre organs had at least ten ranks.

The largest known Smith organs were both 4 manuals and 16 ranks, so that this organ in question was probably between 10 and 14 ranks, or so.

This is quite large for a little 350-seat theatre, since most theatres of this size either had a photoplayer (such as those made by American Photo Player Co, or Wurlitzer) or simply a person playing the piano, or, if an organ, nothing larger than about six or seven ranks (and thus, two manuals). Thus, I think it is unlikely this is the same theatre mentioned in the book.

Does anybody know more about this instrument, or a larger “Pasadena Theatre?” in Pasadena?
Thanks!

AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about Varsity Theatre on Apr 25, 2014 at 2:45 am

I hope they re-open this nice theatre at some point, but at least most of it is still there and in use in some fashion.

According to “The Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Organ” by David L. Junchen, pg. 628, the Varsity Theatre in Palo Alto, California, had a two manual, 7 rank Leathurby-Smith theatre pipe organ installed at some point. The book does not give a date or any further details on the instrument, and does not even say whether it was installed in the “old” (pre-1927) Varsity Theatre (probably, in my opinion), or the “new” (post-1927) Varsity Theatre (less likely, in my opinion).

Does anyone know what happened to this organ?

AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about Stanford Theatre on Apr 25, 2014 at 2:37 am

It is wonderful that this theatre is open, showing movies, and also has a theatre organ installed and playing, although I must agree with Mr. Jensen that 20 ranks is plenty large enough (especially for a Wurlitzer), and it doesn’t seem right to take another additional organ and add it to this one, although this sort of thing has happened countless times over the years.

Couldn’t the buyer of opus 274 have found a good home for it, the way it is/was?

Regardless, the “Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Organ”, pg. 628, notes that the Fox Stanford Theatre in Palo Alto, California, had a three manual, 10 rank Leathurby-Smith theatre pipe organ installed in 1925. The blower serial # for this organ is 16848, and the blower was 5 horsepower, putting out 10" of wind.

Does anybody know what happened to this organ and where it (or its parts) are today?

Mr. Bob Loesch, of Northern CA, noted on his website (no longer up) that he started out learning to play the theatre organ on a 3-manual 10-rank Smith organ, and provided a photo of the organ’s console on his website. Could this be the same instrument?

Smith appears to have built relatively few three-manual organs (at least seven of them, compared with dozens of two-manual organs), could this be the same one?

AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about Strand Theater on Apr 25, 2014 at 2:28 am

According to “The Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Organ” by David L. Junchen, pg. 628,

an “unidentified theatre” in Oxnard had a two manual, three rank Smith theatre pipe organ installed at some point.

No date or other details are given in the book.

Looking through the pages for various Oxnard theatres in this website, it seems possible that the Aztec Theatre, or the Strand Theatre, could have been a home to this instrument at one point, since Smith installed most of their organs between about 1916 and 1926. Does anybody know more?

AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about Aztec Theatre on Apr 25, 2014 at 2:27 am

According to “The Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Organ” by David L. Junchen, pg. 628,

an “unidentified theatre” in Oxnard had a two manual, three rank Smith theatre pipe organ installed at some point.

No date or other details are given in the book.

Looking through the pages for various Oxnard theatres in this website, it seems possible that the Aztec Theatre, or the Strand Theatre, could have been a home to this instrument at one point, since Smith installed most of their organs between about 1916 and 1926. Does anybody know more?

AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about Piedmont Theatre on Apr 25, 2014 at 2:22 am

According to “The Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Organ” by David L. Junchen, pg. 628, the Piedmont Theatre in Oakland had a Seeburg-Smith theatre pipe organ installed in 1920. The book does not give the # of manuals or # of ranks for this organ.

The organ’s blower serial # was 1181, and it was a 2 horsepower blower delivering 10" of air pressure.

The book also claims that the theatre opened as the “Kadie Hilber Theatre”. I’m not sure what to make of that!

Does anybody know what happened to this organ?

AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about Twelfth Street Theater on Apr 25, 2014 at 2:17 am

According to pg. 628 of “The Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Organ” by David L. Junchen, the Orpheum (Twelfth St.) (Follies) (Twelfth St.) Theatre in Oakland (located at 568 12th Street as per the book) had a two-manual Smith theatre pipe organ installed at some point.

No date, nor additional details on the organ (like # of ranks) is given.

Does anybody know what happened to this organ?

AndrewBarrett
AndrewBarrett commented about New Fruitvale Theater on Apr 25, 2014 at 2:07 am

According to “The Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Organ” pg. 628, the New Fruitvale Theatre in Oakland had a two-manual, seven-rank Smith theatre pipe organ installed in 1926.

Does anyone know what happened to it?