Comments from Jack Theakston

Showing 1 - 25 of 35 comments

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about Strand Theatre on Jul 14, 2016 at 1:51 am

This is not the Strand/Carroll, but the Lyric/Regent. The promotion is also for the film BELOW THE SURFACE (1921), not SUBMARINE (1928)

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about CAPITOL THEATRE LIGHT CONTROL on Mar 19, 2016 at 11:59 pm

Stagehand Lon Mason.

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about Capitol Twin Theatre on Mar 19, 2016 at 11:56 pm

I suspect this was built on the site of the Victoria Theatre. The architect here was Leon Lempert, Jr., who designed many of the other Comerfords. The sign on the front of the building is similar to early designs for Lempert’s Capitol in Rome, NY, also partly a Comerford house.

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about Capitol Theatre on Jan 28, 2016 at 7:08 pm

The September 14, 1940 issue of BoxOffice shows the interior remodeled by the Wood Conversion Company. Fairly plain look.

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about Sherman Theatre on Jan 21, 2016 at 7:21 pm

Opened in September 1918 on the site of what was previously “The Duck,” a famous docked boat, destroyed by fire. Opening attraction was Theda Bara in “Salome.” Seated 1,000, and had a stage for live performances, too. Originally managed by J. Elmer Redelle, a former Shubert manager who left about a year later to manage the Victory in Dayton. Victor Cohn took over for him, but when Camp Sherman closed after the War, business went downhill. C. A. Smith, who owned the Star and the Queen eventually took it over. William J. Cowdrey was the organist there in the 1920s. The Paramount film “Huckleberry Finn” had its world premiere there in 1920.

Warner Theaters took the Sherman over in 1931. Managerial turnover was fast there, as L. R. Barhydt, Floyd D. Morrow, Robert A. Momm, Harland Fend, Paul J. Montavon, and Don H. Jacobs were later managers.

On the cusp of new improvements, the future of the theater was doomed starting in 1947 when the town started plans to practice eminent domain to take over what were called “old canal” land upon which the theater and other buildings were built. The theater closed in December 1954, at which time it was raised and Water St., on which the side of the theater sat, was expanded to four lanes.

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about Rex Theatre on Dec 1, 2015 at 9:41 pm

Part of the Comerford chain as of 1930.

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about Strand Theater on Dec 1, 2015 at 9:18 pm

If the sister organ at the Capitol in Rome, NY is any indication, the console may have originally been stained with gold fleck.

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about Hawaii Theatre on Jul 12, 2015 at 6:51 pm

Article from Showmen’s Trade Review about the opening of the Hawaii: http://www.archive.org/stream/showmenstraderev32lewi#page/n499/mode/2up/

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about State Theatre on Mar 8, 2015 at 3:24 am

Lempert Jr. was the architect. Sr. died in 1909. The moniker “& Son” was a formality left over.

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about Dazzle Theatre on Mar 7, 2015 at 7:44 pm

Architect was Michael DeAngelis. Seating was originally 500. Architectural style is actually Italian Renaissance. Was owned in the late ‘20s by Major L. J. Waterbury, who also owned the Staley in Rochester.

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about Bow-Tie Cinemas Fine Arts on Mar 3, 2015 at 8:10 am

I can’t figure how there was an annex of retail space. The theater is in the corner of the mall. Where did they take over space?

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about Murray Hill Cinema on Feb 24, 2015 at 5:26 am

Saw many, many films here in the ‘80s and '90s. At that time, most of the buildings in the area were still three-story tenements from the old days, but the writing was on the wall when they started tearing those down.

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about Loew's 34th Street Showplace on Feb 24, 2015 at 5:23 am

I would love to see some interior photos if someone rustled them up. I remember the decoration was terrible—very much the type of stuff Loew’s was doing all over at the time. I remember the Murray Hill Cinema was the better venue with better selections, but this one had the better projection.

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about Gramercy Theater on Feb 24, 2015 at 5:14 am

Saw many films here in the late ‘80s/early '90s, but it just couldn’t keep up with the Cineplex Odeon on 23rd and the row of theaters on 34th. The eyeglasses store had that great pink neon sign next door (seen in the photo above not lit) that could have only been designed in the '70s or '80s.

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about Cinema 304 on Oct 23, 2014 at 4:25 am

Last show had to be no later than 1999 or 2000. I’m fairly certain it was STAR WARS: THE PHANTOM MENACE. I went to see that film on its run there and remember it closing shortly thereafter. I actually preferred this theater to Clearview’s Cinema 6 in New City—a not half-bad twinning job, and I remember the sound in particular was good at this venue. Nice location, too… the shopping center had LOTS of parking.

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about Granada Theatre on Sep 4, 2014 at 7:39 pm

The American was, indeed, the original name of the theater. It was constructed in 1912 and opened sometime between January and February of 1913. As mentioned in the article above, it was constructed at a cost of $150,000 by H. A. Sims of the Liberty Theatre Company, who by earlier accounts had been in the business since 1903. The Liberty Theatre company was made up primarily of bankers and businessmen from the area. The seating capacity was 3,000. The American had a 16-piece orchestra, conducted by J. J. McClellan, previously the organist of the Mormon Tabernacle. McClellan conducted from the $30,000 Kimball organ installed.

The American was taken over in June of 1928 by the American Theatre Operating Co. of Ogden, A. L. Glassman, president. The theater was extensively remodeled in the then-popular Spanish Renaissance style by Arthur Shreve of Ogden. It re-opened as the Granada on March 8, 1929, with sound film equipment installed. The re-opening feature was THE IRON MASK with Douglas Fairbanks.

A mere two months later, on March 16, 1929, the Granada was sold to W. T. Grant’s, which re-opened the converted space in January 1930. Grant’s closed sometime in the ‘70s, I believe. The site is now Gallivan Plaza.

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about Arcade Theater on Apr 2, 2014 at 9:11 pm

Actually, if you look closely, the keystone says 1916. So it was the “new” Opera House as built by Le Richeux. The original (pictured in this book: http://books.google.com/books?id=X9EwAQAAMAAJ) was constructed in 1892 and was designed by Leon J. Lempert and Son of Rochester, who designed a number of opera houses in the area, including both the Washington Street Opera House and Lyric Theater in Rome. Lempert, Jr. later designed the Capitol in Rome in 1928.

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about Strand Theater on Feb 10, 2014 at 9:58 pm

I was referring to the “before” picture. Those poster cases and fixtures are similar to the ones that were installed by Lempert’s crews in all of the Comerford theaters during that period.

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about some original lighting on Jan 15, 2014 at 9:25 pm

Any idea on who manufactured these lighting fixtures? They look similar to those I’ve seen by Moe-Bridges, but that style was very generic. These look late ‘30s/early '40s.

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about Avon Theater on Jun 27, 2013 at 3:03 am

I believe the Sherwood was original opened around 1914, and was owned by a gentleman by the name of Ralph Balducci, who leased it to Herman Rakov. Rakov owned a number of theaters in the Central New York area. A 1921 New York Supreme Court case shows that Rakov was given the boot for not living up to conditions stated in his lease (and judging from a number of other lawsuits against him, did the same everywhere), and in January 1921, the theater was leased to Mike Kallet.

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about Lincoln Theater on Apr 5, 2013 at 9:09 pm

Originally built as a Kallet Bros. house.

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about James Theater on Apr 5, 2013 at 9:05 pm

The Kallet Bros. bought the James from Sam Slotnick in October 1927.

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about Capitol Theatre on Feb 25, 2013 at 10:39 pm

Listed as a Comerford-Publix theater in the 1945-46 International Motion Picture Almanac. The architect was likely Leon Lempert, Jr.

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about Pastime Theater on Feb 25, 2013 at 7:20 pm

Listed as operated by the Comerford-Publix chain in the 1945-46 International Motion Picture Almanac.

Jack Theakston
Jack Theakston commented about Capitol Twin Theatre on Feb 25, 2013 at 7:11 pm

Listed in in the 1945-46 International Motion Picture Almanac as a Comerford-Publix Theater. I suspect the architect was Leon Lempert, Jr. Does anyone have any clear interior photographs?