TCL Chinese Theatre

6925 Hollywood Boulevard,
Los Angeles, CA 90028

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Grauman's Chinese Theatre

Viewing: Photo | Street View

The Chinese Theatre is arguably the most famous movie theatre in the world. It opened as Grauman’s Chinese Theatre on May 18, 1927 with Cecil B. DeMille’s “The King of Kings” starring H.B. Warner and a stage prologue “Glories of the Scripture” which had a cast of 200. Seating was provided for 2,200, all on a single sloping floor (apart from a private box located at the rear, to the left of the projection box overhanging the rear orchestra seating). The theatre was equipped with a Wurlitzer 3 manual 17 ranks theatre organ which was opened by organist Frederick Burr Scholl, and accompanied the 65-piece symphony orchestra conducted by Constantine Bakaleinikoff. The Chinese Theatre has been the site of thousands of movie premieres and the destination of millions of tourists. Scores of celebrities have left their footprints, hand prints and hoof prints on the walkways near and on the theatre’s courtyard.

In 1973, Mann Theatres bought the Chinese Theatre. Two auditoriums, each seating 750, were added next to the Chinese Theatre, turning the theatre into a triplex operation from April 12, 1979. In 2000, the two added auditoriums were razed to make way for the construction of the Kodak Theatre — the new site of the Oscars.

In 2001, the original 1927 built Chinese Theatre underwent a renovation to return its exterior to its original design and Mann Theatres, in late-2001, also added an adjoining 6-screen multiplex theatre, designed by the architectural firm Behr Browers Architects of Westlake, CA. Seating capacities in the six new screens are: 459, 177, 177, 177, 177, 279.

Still opulent in red tonality and Asiatic influences, the main original auditorium of Grauman’s Chinese Theatre remains the ultimate movie palace experience, and now seats 1,162.

In August 2009, Mann Theatres announced they were planning to put the Chinese Theatre up ‘For Sale’, and it was sold to an independent operator in April 2011. In January 2013, the naming rights were sold to television manufacturer Television China Ltd., and it was renamed TCL Chinese Theatre.

The main original auditorium was closed at the end of April 2013. Renovations to turn the historic auditorium into a 986-seat IMAX theatre, with a 46 foot tall x 94 foot wide screen were completed on September 15, 2013 when the world premiere of the updated 1939 classic movie “The Wizard of Oz-3D” was screened on the giant IMAX screen.

Recent comments (view all 1,520 comments)

moviebuff82
moviebuff82 on April 6, 2015 at 12:28 pm

What’s the next Chinese language movie to be shown at this theater and why is this theater the only one in the US to be named that?

RobertAlex
RobertAlex on April 6, 2015 at 12:57 pm

moviebuff, this is/was Grauman’s Chinese Theater and does not show Chinese movies ( but named for the architecture and decor)? I would read the overview above.

moviebuff82
moviebuff82 on April 6, 2015 at 1:01 pm

Ok. Who would win in a fight the Chinese or Lincoln square in nyc? I say Lincoln square because of the real Imax screen and it’s well done multiplex screens.

Giles
Giles on April 6, 2015 at 10:45 pm

the new IMAX laser system features 12-channel sound (to compete with Dolby Atmos and Auro 11.1) – did they actually install the requisite 4-ceiling speakers??

RobertAlex
RobertAlex on April 7, 2015 at 8:50 am

yes, there are 4 speakers on the ceiling.

Cliffs
Cliffs on April 9, 2015 at 9:16 pm

Yeah, the sound post IMAX conversion wasn’t very impressive. Very loud but not very crisp or detailed. Since the redo with the 12.1 it seems to have fixed that problem and made the sound better than ever.

markinthedark, My understanding is that IMAX won’t allow masking on IMAX branded presentations. They want that full screen displayed regardless of whether or not it’s fully used. I agree, on stuff like Furious 7 that doesn’t shift aspect ratios, it would be nice to get it masked properly. I will say, however, that with the new laser projection and new deep black levels, I almost could never tell there was no masking. Hopefully IMAX relaxes that rule in the future, but they want to make sure audiences know their screens are BIIIIIIIIG!!!!

Giles
Giles on April 9, 2015 at 9:48 pm

a recent (two days ago) picture shows the auditorium with the ceiling speakers:

https://i0.wp.com/silverscreeningreviews.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/Furious-7-In-Imax-Las_Lest.jpg

they are tastefully integrated/installed into the ornate ceiling.

hdtv267
hdtv267 on April 10, 2015 at 1:23 am

Thanks for the link and photo. Sucks how would be a great photo is diminished by some jackass on a smart phone. If anyone finds other photos or links, please post them. Ok?

rasLXR
rasLXR on May 3, 2015 at 4:43 pm

http://www.graumanschinese.org/projection-1.html

Good site.

RogerA
RogerA on May 3, 2015 at 9:36 pm

http://www.graumanschinese.org/projection-1.html

Great site. Hollywood history like this needs to be documented so the know how to do it right is not lost. My cudos to who ever put this site together.

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