The latest movie theater news and updates

  • May 26, 2005

    Rent/Buy Historic Theater For Just $1.00

    NEW LONDON, CT — This Historic Theater, in the heart of New London’s Downtown. a National Register Historic District, is “desperately seeking” a Developer with Imagination and Resources to bring her back to life! PRICE IS NEGOTIABLE.

    If you have a good idea and the ability to put idea into action, we will talk to you. The Capital is a former 100-seat vaudeville theatre. Named by National Trust for Historic Preservation as one of the USA’s most significant historic theaters in need of development! Building is owned by City of New London. Sale contingent upon proposed use, and must be approved by New London City Council. Interior and facade need extensive renovation. New Roof installed in 2000. Main floor and balcony; stage; three floors and lobby.

    Become a part of Downtown New London’s Exciting Rebirth!

    For more info, visit:
    http://www.fastfacility.com/ct/FactSheet.asp?7805

    ABOUT NEW LONDON, CT:

    **“New London, Conn., best-priced U.S. city
    Survey ranks it 1st when costs, jobs, pay are combined” (See this report from the San Francisco Chronicle.)

    **“New London topped our list with salary ranges above the national average, a low cost of living, and a low unemployment rate.” (See Salary.com’s Salary Value Index.)

  • May 25, 2005

    The Megaplex Turns “10”

    The Associated Press takes an interesting look at the history of the megaplex…

    While it seems as if gigantic movie theaters have been with us forever, the megaplex theater — defined as having 14 or more screens and modern amenities like stadium-style seating — turned 10 years old last week.

    AMC Entertainment opened the first, the Grand 24 in Dallas, on May 19, 1995, ushering in a concept that used its scale to change how movies are shown. Ticket prices and audience expectations have gone up in the 10 years since, and megaplexes now face problems of their own.

    The idea was to match the successful “big-box” stores sprouting across suburbia, said Peter Brown, chief executive officer of Kansas Citybased AMC, which now operates 229 theaters, 77 percent of which are megaplexes.

    Pretty interesting read. There’s more at the East Valley Tribune website.

  • May 24, 2005

    Today’s Newsreel

  • May 23, 2005

    Cecchi Gori Fine Arts Theatre Closed

    BEVERLY HILLS, CA — Last Wednesday night, May 18th, was the last night of operation for the Cecchi Gori Fine Arts Theatre.

    Arthouse chain Landmark has been booking the theater since the mid-‘90’s. No word has been issued if this is a decision made by Landmark or by the Cecchi Gori family who own the building, and no further information is available as to what will happen to the theater.

  • The Future Of Movie-Going In Canada?

    CANADA — A recent story in the Globe and Mail reported that Cineplex Galaxy movie theatre chain is considering buying its biggest competitor – Famous Players.

    If the sale takers place and is approved by the Canadian government’s Competition Bureau, Cineplex-Galaxy would own slightly more than 70 percent of Canada’s movie screens.

    The story also includes a hint of what to expect in the future when you buy your ticket. According to the head of Cineplex-Galaxy, there will be about 20 minutes of ads and promo’s projected digitally before the lights go out for the main feature. This is seen as a way to keep the price of tickets down.

  • May 20, 2005

    Sundance Group Announces Cinema Intention

    PROVO, UT — This just crossed BusinessWire — The Sundance Group has just announced new plans for an art house circuit:

    “The Utah-based Sundance Group announced today that it is going forward with long held plans for a Sundance Cinemas movie theatre circuit. The new venture brings together Robert Redford’s Sundance brand, a recognized name in independent film, with the seasoned specialized theatre management team of Paul Richardson and Bert Manzari. Investment funds managed by Oaktree Capital Management are financing the new company.

    Richardson will serve as President and CEO, with Manzari taking the reins as President of Film and Marketing. The Cinemas will strive to incorporate the best in independent, documentary, and foreign language film, as well as quality studio films, and original programming, which will include shorts, filmmaker interviews, forums, and other value added features.

  • Today’s Newsreel

  • GVI Signs Agreement to Save Zoe Theatre in Pittsfield, Illinois

    PITTSFIELD, IL – Grande Venues, headquartered in Wheaton, Illinois, signed a unique consulting agreement with the City of Pittsfield, Illinois to perform a “Modified Arts Assessment and Feasibility Study” for the region. The contract begins immediately to determine if the public will support the Zoe Theatre located downtown Pittsfield.

    The theatre has been shuttered for many years. Bill McCartney of the Economic Development Office said that “this is a a good way for us to determine whether the community will support a theatre. Before we spend funds, let’s see if the project will fly.” GVI begins their work immediately. Paul Warshauer, Mike Novelli and their staff will interview the public, members in the arts and education community, city officials, business leaders, and “angels.”

  • MTC – Movie Theater Club In Hamilton Ontario

    Would anyone be interested in forming a Movie Theater Club In Hamilton. Ontario? I have some great ideas for the club and I would like to try to form a club sometime in June 2005. I’m already getting started on a website where you can post photos of classic theaters for the Greater Hamilton area. I have alot of history on alot of classic theaters in Hamilton.

    Please contact me @
    Chad I.

  • May 19, 2005

    The New Waverly Set to Open June 17

    NEW YORK, NY — IFC Center Channels Historic Movie House

    “What could be better than running an art house in downtown New York?” asks John Vanco, VP and general manager of the new IFC Center (www.ifccenter.com), scheduled to open June 17 in the historic Waverly Theater building in Manhattan.

    “It’s going to be a combination of all sorts of different films from all sorts of places,” he promises. “One house will be on a calendar schedule, including two-week locks of new films, special series and classics. The other two will be edgy, independent, foreign-language films and documentaries. We will also have a digital pre-show with short films and other content…that people will feel good about having spent ten dollars to see. If we’re doing a retrospective or a series of midnight movies, it will be a great advantage to have the edit suites upstairs.”