Comments from 42ndStreetMemories

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42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about Radio City Music Hall on Feb 22, 2007 at 8:21 am

JANE RUSSELL, 38D, in 3D. THREE TIMES! That’s something to cherish, Vito.

As Bob Hope said, “Ladies and Gentlemen, the two and only…Jane Russell”

42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about Radio City Music Hall on Feb 21, 2007 at 4:31 pm

After all of the RCMH ads, I don’t know why I analyzed this one, but I did:

  1. I’m surprised that doors opened only 15 minutes prior to the first show. Doesn’t seem like enough time to get everyone seated, or encourage visits to concession stands, etc….It appears that the ad was for Wednesday/Thursday only, not a peak period. Was it different for the weekend or Christmas shows?

  2. With a running time of 126 minutes for THE JOURNEY, that left 8 minutes before the start of the stage show. Again, not much time for concession visits….And 44 minutes before the start of the next showing of THE JOURNEY. How long was a typical stage show. 36 minutes? With another 8 minute intermission?

  3. Funny to see start times listed at odd times like 1:19 pm and 4:07. Brought back a memory that we didn’t pay much attention to start times back then, at least at the local neighborhood theaters. We walked in and watched until someone said, “This is where we came in”. Sometimes, with a double feature, you didn’t even know what movie you were watching for a while.

  4. And parking was 50 cents for 6 ½ hours! jk

42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about Times Square Theatre on Feb 19, 2007 at 12:44 am

Bryan,

That picture was posted on the site for the New York, aka Globe, Big Apple theater. jk

42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about Joyce Theater on Jan 26, 2007 at 6:42 am

Duke, I lived on 24th & 8th and many of my friends were Cuban & Puerto Rican. Whenever we went by the Elgin, I would ask them to translate the titles as I scanned every lobby card. The poster artwork was great.

Thanks for the tip on the book, AlAlvarez.

42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about Center Theatre on Jan 1, 2007 at 10:43 am

The RKO ROXY is the focus of a 1933 animated short OPENING NIGHT. It is part of a pre-code DVD compilation called CARTOON CRAZIES – BANNED & CENSORED which we found in the library. Check it out.

42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about Radio City Music Hall on Dec 28, 2006 at 2:44 am

Video celebrating the December 27, 1932 grand opening of RCMH.

View link

42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about Guild Theater on Dec 24, 2006 at 5:49 am

Saw the excellent film THE QUEEN yesterday and today running through my files, I happened across this booking at the Guild from 1953

View link

Interesting that a “short” playing at the Thalia at the same time was “GENTLEMEN…THE QUEEN”

Demonstrates what life was before cable TV 24/7 news programming.

Happy Holidays, CTers

42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about RKO 23rd Street Theatre on Dec 24, 2006 at 5:13 am

3D at the RKO….1953. Note the “short”…Nat King Cole in 3D!

View link

Happy Holidays, CTers.

42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about Loew's Sheridan Theatre on Dec 24, 2006 at 5:04 am

Martin & Lewis on the PANORAMIC Sheridan screen in 1953. Note the emphasis on W-I-D-E screen, Technicolor, and 3-D to combat the evils of television. And COOL at the top didn’t mean hip.

View link

Happy Holidays, CTers

42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about Cinema Treasures hits 15,000 theaters on Dec 15, 2006 at 7:12 am

Can’t tell you how much I’ve enjoyed this site over the past few years. Thanks to everyone providing the site support and thanks to all the great posters who have provided so much history and insight.

Happy Holidays and Have a Great 2007! Peace. jerry

42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about New Amsterdam Theatre on Dec 14, 2006 at 4:55 am

I always loved this shot. 3D on the Deuce. Like it wasn’t scary enough. Also, if you look at the Lyric, there’s an example of how they would frequently alter the titles on the marquee to make them more 42nd Street type fare. Here, a harmless western comedy “ALONG CAME JONES” became “Along Came KILLER JONES”. jerry

42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about Rialto Theatre on Dec 11, 2006 at 11:18 am

Hey, Warren. I thought we had exhausted every internet image of the Deuce. Where did you come up with the new stuff? jerry

42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about New Victory Theatre on Nov 30, 2006 at 5:59 am

Marquee shot from circa 1962

View link

42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about Times Square Theatre on Nov 30, 2006 at 5:55 am

Wonderful 1950s shot a marquee change. Ride Clear of Diablo AND ON THE SAME PROGRAM…The Tall Texan

View link

jk

42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about Loew's State Theatre on Nov 28, 2006 at 8:13 am

BrooklynJim,

This is from IMDB…..

Although filmed in the standard 1.37-1 aspect ratio, Thunder Bay was chosen by Universal-International as its first wide screen feature, accomplishing this by cropping the top and bottom and projecting it at 1.85-1 at Loew’s State Theatre in New York City, as well as other sites. Its initial presentation also marked UI’s first use of directional stereophonic sound. jerry

42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about RKO 23rd Street Theatre on Nov 5, 2006 at 8:47 am

In the latest issue of FILMS OF THE GOLDEN AGE magazine, they published an edited version of an article I did on the old RKO 23rd Street.

On the home page, you can request a free sample. I do not know if you’ll receive this issue, but hey, it’s free.

Keeping the memory alive!

http://www.filmsofthegoldenage.com/

42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about Visual Arts Theatre on Oct 24, 2006 at 10:59 am

I haven’t posted on this site in a while. I lived in the co-op down the street from the theater, watched every brick go in, then lamented the programming for years, pining for the old RKO on 8th avenue.

A friend from Chelsea, Kenny,recently found these images. Enjoy

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The lounge in image 4 would be to the left of the snack bar. The view in image 5 is taken from a row of glass entrance doors.

The marquee shows the inaugural booking, The Trial. Man, were we bummed. IMDB lists the NYC premiere in Feb, 1963. And as I stated earlier the 3 Stooges appeared opening night in a limo. Jerry K

42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about AMC Empire 25 on Oct 10, 2006 at 11:03 am

Great shot, Ed. Classic image of the Deuce in general back then, especially the guy sleeping 2-3 rows from the top. Usually a relatively calm audience, except when the snoring started, most likely more than one guy at a time, with others screaming for them to “shut up”. Great stuff.

I wonder what was playing. jerry the k

42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about Apollo Theatre on Sep 28, 2006 at 8:37 am

You got me, Ed. And the imagery of Sophia Loren in a rubber suit wrecking havoc is not a bad one.

42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about Apollo Theatre on Sep 28, 2006 at 8:18 am

When did the Apollo, of all places, switch from “art house” flics to Godzilla fare. My last CUE ends in 1970 and it was still booking foreign films.

42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about Chelsea Theater on Sep 19, 2006 at 11:04 am

In the Chelsea neighborhood of the 1950s, 8th avenue was a dividing line between the Black/Hispanic community (on the east side of 8th), which supported the Chelsea and the Elgin, and the white community (west side of 8th), which supported the RKO 23rd Street and The Terrace on 23rd Street between 8th & 9th. By 1960 they were all gone except for the Elgin which still remains. jk

42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about Paramount Theatre on Sep 1, 2006 at 10:32 am

Bill,

I agree with the excitement of feverishly scanning the new TV Guide for the Early Show, The Late Show (during summer vacation) and Million Dollar Movie. Also, the anticipation of “what will they show” when a ballgame doubleheader was rained out.

Back to being almost on-topic. I caught “Journey” at my RKO 23rd St with “Miracle of the Hills” with Rex Reason. I remember seeing it with dad on Friday night and begging my mom to let me see it again with the kids on Saturday. No luck.

42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about Terrace Theater on Sep 1, 2006 at 9:09 am

Thanks, Warren. Now all I need is a photo and programming from the 50s. Jerry

42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about Terrace Theater on Aug 28, 2006 at 3:21 am

NYT article on 2-4-27 mentions the sale of Jenny “The Swedish Nightingale” Lind’s home at 361 West 23rd Street in Chelsea. Previous poster mentions an organ being installed in the same year 1927 at The Terrace so I believe that the address listed in my 1956 Film Yearbook as 361 West 23rd Street for The Terrace is in error.

Here’s the article:
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Here’s the pic:
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Still looking for photos and info on the theater. Help! jerry

42ndStreetMemories
42ndStreetMemories commented about Rialto Theatre on Aug 15, 2006 at 5:52 am

A friend emailed this NYT article to me recently. jerry

July 19, 1987
STREETSCAPES: THE RIALTO THEATER; A Times Sq. Cinema Nurtured By the ‘Merchant of Menace'
By CHRISTOPHER GRAY

LEAD: IT is apparently the largest glass block facade in New York City, an unusual Art Moderne theater of blue and white glass with streamlined aluminum fins.

IT is apparently the largest glass block facade in New York City, an unusual Art Moderne theater of blue and white glass with streamlined aluminum fins.

But the building that once housed the old Rialto Theater is scheduled to make way next year for the joint city-state 42d Street Development Project, unless the building’s long-term lessees can prevent condemnation, or the project falls through. In fact, a new theater, the Cineplex Odeon Warner, has recently opened in the old Rialto space.

The 1935 Rialto, at the northwest corner of 42d and Seventh Avenue, was designed with a 750-seat theater with stores on the ground and subway levels, a special subway entrance and offices and a restaurant above with a circular dance floor.

The architects of the Rialto were Thomas Lamb and Rosario Candela. Lamb was a prolific theater architect; he also designed the Empire Theater at 236 West 42d Street, among others. Candela had designed many luxury apartments on Fifth and Park Avenues in the 1920’s.

But the Rialto had little precedent. Above a first floor of unexceptional storefronts, the second floor was composed of alternating deep blue glass with white marbling and strips of metal. Above these were protruding aluminum fins similar to those found on engines and other mechanical equipment. The third floor was composed entirely of cream-colored glass blocks in alternating curved and faceted bays.

A parapet wall and an 80-foot-high corner tower, also in the same glass, crowned the building. The upper section had an illuminated strip sign carrying local and entertainment news.

Lewis Mumford, the urban historian and architectural critic, writing in The New Yorker in 1936, described the colors as ‘'unspeakable’‘ and said the overall design was a ’‘wisecrack.’‘ But a 1935 newspaper article called the building ’‘the most ambitious glass structure thus far,’‘ and the same system was used in building the Queens-Midtown Tunnel in 1940.

The Rialto opened for Christmas of 1935 with Frank Buck’s ‘'Fang and Claw.’‘ The theater’s manager, Arthur Mayer, saw the Rialto as distinctly masculine in tone. Most theaters, he said in a newspaper interview after the opening, were ’‘rococo, luxurious palaces for the uxorious,’‘ both in styling and choice of films. His theater, both in styling and presentations, sought to satisfy the ’‘ancient and unquenchable male thirst for mystery, menace and manslaughter.’‘ He was soon called the ’‘merchant of menace.’'

The restaurant was apparently removed around 1950, and its space taken over for a succession of studio uses, including the Joe Franklin television show. As West 42d Street declined, so did the theater, and by the 1960’s it was satisfying another seemingly ‘'ancient and unquenchable thirst’‘ – for pornographic movies. In the early 1980’s, it had a short run as a theater for stage plays.

The Times Square area has been the focus of various redevelopment plans. The most recent involves the renovation of most of the theaters, and the replacement of the Rialto building with an office building. The decision on what buildings to preserve was based, in part, on a 1981 report by two historians, Adolf Placzek and Dennis McFadden, who said the Rialto had ‘'no outstanding merit.’‘ Their report also found the Candler Building, at 220 West 42d Street, was not eligible for landmark regulation.

But in 1980, the building had already been independently recommended by New York State for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. And the Landmarks Commission recently held hearings on the designation of another Art Moderne theater, the Metro, on Broadway near 99th.

The Rialto building is owned by the Kohlberg family trust. An officer at the Chemical Bank, which administers the trust, said the bank will not oppose the condemnation proceedings. But the Brandt Organization, which holds a 100-year lease on the building from the trust that dates to 1953, is opposing the project. It would terminate Brandt’s lease, now well below market value. The Brandts have recently subleased the Rialto Theater to the Cineplex Odeon Corporation, which has spent $1.5 million to reopen the theater.

A spokesman for Cineplex Odeon said the Times Square project, which would mean the demolition of the building, was considered ‘'only a possibility, not a certainty.’'

  • Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company