Theaters

  • July 16, 2004

    Former Times Square Theatre to Become Retail Space

    NEW YORK, NY — One of the last former Times Square movie houses to remain vacant, the Times Square Theatre at 217 W. 42nd Street, has been acquired by the urban apparel retailer, Ecko, which just a month ago announced the move of its corporate headquarters to a new location in Chelsea.

    According to this report from GlobeSt.com, Ecko expects to open its store in the three-story building by 2006, with construction beginning early next year. More information can be found in the New York Times.

    The Times Square Theatre was opened in 1920 for the Selwyns, and designed by Eugene DeRosa. Ecko plans to keep several historic architectural features of the theater, including its 25 foot-tall proscenium arch, its domed ceiling, and its ornamental plasterwork.

  • July 13, 2004

    Today’s Newsreel

    Boston’s Opera House prepares to reopen, a battle is on to save the Odeon in Christchurch, New Zealand, while the Strand in Plattsburgh, NY looks ready for its comeback — all in today’s newsreel.

  • July 6, 2004

    Boyd Theatre Wins Citation

    PHILADELPHIA, PA — The following was sent in by Howard Haas, Chairman of Friends of the Boyd:

    “Attached is my photo of the beautiful Commonwealth of PA (House) Citation for the Boyd Theatre.

    I’ve typed the entire citation below:

  • La Cinematheque Francaise Will Move in 2005

    After a long story and conflicts, there will be a new house for La Cinematheque Francaise in Paris.

    The new building, former American center of Paris and designed by the famous architect Frank Gehry in the district of Bercy, was dark for years after a bankrupcy. Part of the building was never settled but there was an auditorium already. With four auditoriums (three added), it will be a must for movie lovers.

    Opening in autumn 2005, it will cause the closing of the historical Palais du Trocadero auditorium and later the auditorium of the “Grands Boulevards.”

  • July 2, 2004

    Wall Collapses At Hamilton’s Tivoli Theatre

    HAMILTON, ONTARIO — A section of the wall on the south side of the landmark Tivoli Theatre collapsed on June 29th in the evening hours, according to the Toronto Star. Fortunately, no one was in the Tivoli and no one was injured, according to fire crews.

    When fire and police personnel arrived at the building, after it was reported that smoke was coming from the Tivoli, they found the large hole in the building. The city’s structural engineers are currently determining whether or not the roof is in danger of caving in.

  • July 1, 2004

    St. George Theatre Donated To Dance Ensemble

    STATEN ISLAND, NY — The historic St. George Theatre has been donated to the Richmond Dance Ensemble Foundation who will now raise funds to further restore the theater. According to a report in the Staten Island Advance, after deciding against tearing the theater down to make way for a parking lot, the real estate developer who purchased the St. George in 2000 as part of a “package” has now decided to donate it to the community.

    In addition to dance performances, the St. George will also host “dinner theaters, shows and dance workshops for children” and feature a new theater cafe.

    (Thanks to Jean Siegel for sending in this report.)

  • June 24, 2004

    Fox Oakland

    Does anyone know what has happened to the huge Fox Oakland? The last time I saw it was in the 1980s – just sitting there empty, a block or so from the restored Paramount Oakland. This theater is not on Cinema Treasures list of Fox theaters. Has it been torn down? Any info would be appreciated.

    Thanks,
    LDA.

    [Ed — of course, the Fox Oakland is alive and kicking.]

  • June 18, 2004

    Kinopanorama Gets a New Lease on Life

    PARIS, FRANCE — The Kinopanorama was dark for almost two years.

    After a renovation, the theater was given a new name :“Espace Kinopanorama.” The movie theater has been a little altered, but thankfully its curved screen was saved. Now, the theater serves as space for fashion shows, conferences, parties, and such.

    It could have been worse, though. But since the building is still in good share, a return to movies ia always possible.

  • June 14, 2004

    Keith-Albee Acquires $50,000 Organ

    HUNTINGTON, WV — As time edges closer to the opening of the new Stadium Seating mega plex a block from the Thomas Lamb Keith-Albee, the historic theater has gained an organ.

    In addition, Bob Edmunds, a Marshall University speech professor, played a short patriotic concert as a prelude to the presentation of Disney’s “America’s Heart and Soul” at the first Appy Film Fest.

    The small group of organ enthusiasts have invested about $50,000 to bring an organ to the Keith. Edmunds hopes that groups step forward to intervene in what is now a stand off between the federal governemnt which provided the money to put the Keith out of business, the state which has no money available, and local business people who can’t imagine Huntington without the Keith.

  • June 9, 2004

    Mayor To Sign Lease To Friends of the Loew’s Tomorrow

    The following email was sent by the Friends of the Loew’s:

    “In one of his first major acts as Jersey City’s Acting Mayor, L. Harvey Smith will finalize the long-term lease of The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre at Journal Square over to Friends of the Loew’s, Inc. This action will finally clear the way for FOL to undertake a vital fundraising campaign, which, in turn, will make possible additional restoration and the eventual full operation of this Landmark Theatre.

    A press conference and reception to formalize the lease will be held Thursday, June 10, 2004, beginning at 6:30 p.m. in the Grand Lobby of the Loew’s Jersey Theatre, 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, N.J.