Comments from Joe Vogel

Showing 251 - 275 of 10,663 comments

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Grand Theater on Dec 25, 2015 at 12:40 am

The March 3, 1932, issue of the Pittston Gazette reported that the Grand Theatre in Carnegie had been gutted by fire early that morning, with damage estimated at more than $25,000.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Dixie Theatre on Dec 25, 2015 at 12:25 am

An ad in the January 1, 1941, issue of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette offered New Year’s greetings to the community from the New Carnegie Theatre, the New Grand Theatre, the Liberty Theatre, and the Dixie Family Theatre.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Wigton Theatre on Dec 24, 2015 at 11:59 pm

This item appeared in the January, 1916, issue of The Classical Journal, an academic journal which is still being published:

“LaGrange.—Professor Miller’s Dido, the Phoenician Queen was presented with great success at the Wigton Theater by Latin students of the LaGrange High School, on November 12. Miss Marion Nelson appeared in the title r61e. Dale LeCount took the part of Aeneas.”
A James M. Wigton was listed as the manager of the La Grange Opera House in the 1912-1913 edition of the Cahn-Leighton guide. The Wigton Opera House in La Grange was soon to open, according to an item in the September 18, 1915, issue of The Music Trade Review. It’s possible that the theater was new in 1915, or it might be that Mr. Wigton had taken over the Opera House he had been managing in 1912 and renamed it for himself. Either way, it’s probable that the Wigton Opera House of 1915 was the same house as the later Wigton Theatre.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Bainbridge Theatre on Dec 23, 2015 at 7:06 pm

This item is from the March 13, 1926, issue of Motion Picture News:

“Arthur Hirsch and Louis Geller opened their new Mosholu Theatre in uptown New York on Monday evening of this week and practically the entire T. O. C. C. and local exchange representatives were on hand to offer congratulations to the owners on the realization of this attractive neighborhood house which is of single floor design and has a seating capacity of about 1000.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Coronet 1 & 2 on Dec 21, 2015 at 9:59 pm

Samuel Goldwyn Co. acquired the rights to Oklahoma and re-released it in both Todd-AO and 35mm formats in 1982.

Tri-Star ran nationwide sneak previews of Manhattan Murder Mystery the weekend prior to its release on Wednesday, August 18, 1993. A weekend ad for the theater running the preview might have an announcement about the event.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Palace Theater on Dec 21, 2015 at 5:02 pm

This item under the heading “Washington” from the August 18, 1917, issue of Motography notes a name change for this house:

“The Palace Theater at Vancouver will change its name to the American. The manager’s name will be John P. Kiggins. Some improvements and decorations will be made.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Park Place Cinema on Dec 20, 2015 at 6:39 pm

Plans for the Saxe Bros. house that became the Jeffris Theatre were in the works as early as April, 1922, when the project was reported in various construction trade journals. Later, both Saxe Bros. and the architects, Martin Tullgren & Sons, were named as defendants in a lawsuit filed as a result of the partial collapse of the building during construction in 1923.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lyric Theatre on Dec 20, 2015 at 6:08 pm

There were two houses called the Lyric Theatre in Janesville, both operated by James Zanias. These lines from a 1998 book, City on the Rock River : chapters in Janesville’s history, cover the Lyric’s brief history:

“In 1908, James Zanias opened the Lyric Theater at 113 W. Milwaukee St.; around 1915, it moved to 210 W. Milwaukee St., where the Royal nickelodeon had been housed from 1909 to around 1913. The Lyric closed sometime before 1920.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Normandy Theatre on Dec 17, 2015 at 7:52 pm

Ah, I didn’t notice the comment saying that Wometco didn’t take over until 1961.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Normandy Theatre on Dec 17, 2015 at 7:22 pm

I suppose it’s possible that RKO had some kind of deal with Wometco for exclusive early run rights to the studio’s product in the region. RKO had quite a few prestigious theaters in major cities, but I don’t think the circuit as a whole was ever very large. Certainly nothing like Fox or Loew’s or Paramount, or even United Artists.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Cameo Theatre on Dec 17, 2015 at 6:58 pm

I don’t know how this has not already been linked, as the article was published on September 9, 1999, but Cameo Role, from the Miami New Times, gives a history of the theater from its opening through the halcyon days when it was one of the region’s leading live music venues in the 1980s and 1990s. Unfortunately, the 9-photo slide show (click on the image at the top of the article) consists mostly of small pictures from the Cameo’s 1980s punk rock era, with only four shots with the theater itself, and those only showing the marquee.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Normandy Theatre on Dec 17, 2015 at 6:17 pm

Linkrot repair: The small photo showing part of the marquee of the Normandy Theatre in Boxoffice of March 8, 1976, is now here.

The NRHP registration form for the north Shore Historic District refers to this house as “(formerly the RKO Movie Theater, Albert Anis, 1947)” but I’ve been unable to find anything in the theater trade publications connecting the Normandy to RKO.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Surf Theatre on Dec 17, 2015 at 5:58 pm

The NRHP registration form for the North Shore Historic District (PDF here), which includes the Surf Theatre, says that the house was designed by architect Robert E. Collins, who also designed Herman Weingarten’s Cameo Theatre.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Isis Theatre on Dec 17, 2015 at 4:18 pm

bsneed45: Are you sure it was the Isis, at 505 State Street, which became the Shelby Theatre, and not the State Theatre, which was next door at 503 State Street? A document from the Library of Virginia (online here) lists correspondence from the State Theatre in 1958, and from the Shelby Theatre in 1958-1962. That sounds as though there might have been a name change in 1958.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lyric Theatre on Dec 17, 2015 at 3:13 pm

John Houze: I don’t know if you’ve seen this one or not, but your grandfather was also in a group photo of five theater men that was published in the December 13, 1913, issue of The Moving Picture World (scan at Google Books.) I’ve seen many photos of theater managers from that period and most of them look like the sort of toughs you wouldn’t want to run into in a dark alley, but your grandfather was a notable exception to the rule. I’ll bet many of the young ladies of Oshkosh went to the Lyric just to get a look at him. He was quite a handsome fellow.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theatre on Dec 16, 2015 at 4:54 pm

The Garrick was one of a large number of theaters taken over by the Sullivan & Considine vaudeville circuit and renamed Empress in the early 1910s. Most Sullivan & Considine houses were equipped to show movies, and the San Diego operation was no exception. The 1911 San Diego directory has a listing for a Mr. F. Earl Nelson, giving his profession as moving picture operator (projectionist) at the Empress Theatre.

Among the acts that appeared on vaudeville bills at the Empress were Fred Karno’s London Comedians, with headliners Charles Chaplin and Stan Laurel. The troupe appeared at the San Diego Empress at least three times from 1911 to 1913, the last only a few weeks before Chaplin left the company to join Mack Sennett’s Keystone Film Company.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Cineplex-Odeon/Plitt Regency Twin on Dec 11, 2015 at 6:23 pm

Thanks, csmindspring. As Steve McQueen’s movie was released in October, 1968, and I believe it opened nationwide, and the Regency was a first-run house, the theater must have opened in late 1968. Exorcist was released in December, 1973, so the twinning must have taken place in early 1974. Living int he west I never got to attend any of ABC’s Ultravision theaters, but I’ll bet they were very impressive.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Columbia Theatre on Dec 7, 2015 at 7:52 pm

The NRHP Registration Form for the Bristol Commercial Historic District says that the Columbia Theatre was designed by architect Thomas S. Brown, who practiced in Bristol from 1911 to 1915.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Paramount Center for the Arts on Dec 7, 2015 at 7:47 pm

The NRHP Registration Form for the Bristol Commercial Historic District, which includes the Paramount, attributes the design of the theater to an Atlanta firm called McDonald & Company.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Colonial Theatre on Dec 7, 2015 at 12:50 am

The Colonial was one of four theaters in Watertown that had paid a $5.00 Public Building License Fee for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1921, according to the Annual Report of the Commissioner of Insurance to the Governor of South Dakota published that year. The other three houses were the Lyric, Metropolitan and Foto Play.

The finding aid for the Liebenberg & Kaplan papers notes that the firm worked on the Colonial Theatre in 1930. There’s no indication of the extent of this project.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about State Theatre on Dec 7, 2015 at 12:47 am

The finding aid for the Liebenberg & Kaplan papers indicate that the firm did work for the State Theatre in Watertown twice, first in 1937 and again in 1941.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Plaza Twin Cinema on Dec 7, 2015 at 12:43 am

The finding aid for the Liebenberg & Kaplan papers list two projects for the Plaza Theatre in Watertown, one being dated 1948-49 (maybe the original construction) and the other dated 1954 (perhaps alterations to accommodate a CinemaScope screen.)

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lyric Theatre on Dec 7, 2015 at 12:30 am

The finding aid for the Liebenberg & Kaplan papers indicates that the firm did work on the Lyric Theatre in Watertown in 1931, 1935, and 1937. The extent of the projects is not given.

The Lyric was mentioned in the March 30, 1918, issue of Motography. It was then being operated by a firm called McCarthy Brothers, who also had the Rialto and Lyric Theatres in Aberdeen and had just purchased the Grand Theatre in Grand forks.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Park I & II Theatre on Dec 6, 2015 at 11:25 pm

The nearest movie theater to Racine is in the outlying village of Sturtevant, and the next nearest is in Kenosha. It does seem odd that a city of almost 80,000 would be entirely without a movie theater of its own while Sturtevant, with only about 6,000 people, would have a large, modern multiplex.

My guess would be that Sturtevant has been very aggressive at attracting businesses, probably through large tax subsidies. If Racine wants a movie theater it will probably have to cough up a hefty subsidy itself to convince an exhibitor to compete with the Marcus Theatres venue in Sturtevant. Marcus itself probably won’t want to open another multiplex so close to the one it already runs.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Jazz Theatre on Dec 5, 2015 at 6:50 pm

Neal Cassady’s autobiographical book The First Third mentions the Zaza Theatre several times. Several books about Cassady give the address of the Zaza as 1727 Larimer, right next door to the barber shop where Cassady’s father worked. On page 65 of Cassady’s book he says that the Zaza was later renamed the Kiva Theatre (Google Books preview.)

Confirmation of the name change can be found in an item in the November 28, 1942, issue of The Billboard headed “Tab Show For Denver” (scan at Google Books) which says that the 400-seat Zaza Theatre had been renamed the Kiva and reopened with a new policy of tab shows (tabloid shows, which were live performances of excerpts from popular musicals, the shows usually lasting no more than an hour) and movies.

It’s possible that the name Zaza (or Zazza) was added to the Jazz Theatre after the original Zaza became the Kiva. I think we must be dealing with two different theaters, though, the Zaza at 1727 Larimer and the Jazz at 1751 Larimer.