New Beverly Cinema

7165 Beverly Boulevard,
Los Angeles, CA 90036

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New Beverly Cinema

Viewing: Photo | Street View

Built in 1929 and used as a nightclub under various names over the years. On February 8, 1950 it opened as the New Globe Theatre, but stopped showing movies in 1951 and became a Yiddish theatre. On October 23, 1958 it was opened by Robert L. Lippert as a twin screen cinema named the Capri & Riviera Theatres. On September 13, 1963 it was de-twinned and renamed New Yorker Theatre, and on June 11, 1964 it was renamed Europa Theatre. By 1969 it was screening adult movies and this use continued under various names: it became the Eros Theatre on February 11, 1970. In February 1971 it was renamed Beverly Cinema and on August 2, 1972 it was renamed New Beverly Cinema. It stopped screening adult movies in September 1977.

It reopened on May 5, 1978 as a revival house presenting a Marlon Brando double-bill:“A Streetcar Named Desire” and “Last Tango in Paris”.

The New Beverly Cinema is still a beloved venue for classic films. In September 2014 it was taken by film director Quentin Tarantino. All films shown are presented in 35mm or 16mm prints.

Contributed by Ray Martinez, Lee Philipson

Recent comments (view all 112 comments)

troniks
troniks on July 12, 2016 at 2:51 pm

This month the New Beverly unveiled their new website: www.thenewbev.com

JoelWeide
JoelWeide on July 12, 2016 at 10:47 pm

They did an excellent job with the website. Thats awesome!!

rivest266
rivest266 on August 8, 2016 at 5:51 am

Timeline for this cinema.

February 8th, 1950 opened as New Globe. It was opened as a nightclub before.

1951 stopped showing movies

September 13th, 1963 reopened as New Yorker

June 11th, 1964 reopened as Europa, which had shown soviet movies.

1969 adult movies are shown

February 11th, 1970 reopened as Eros

February 1971 renamed Beverly Cinema

August 2nd, 1972 renamed New Beverly

August 1977 the LA Times stopped showing adult movie ads

May 5th, 1978 stopped showing adult movies

2010’s continues to show 35mm movies.

Grand opening ads in the photo section.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on August 8, 2016 at 6:50 am

Mike, your timeline is missing the period from 1959 to 1963 when Robert Lippert operated the house as a twin art cinema called the Riviera & Capri Theatres. I went to the theater once during that period, though I don’t recall which movie I saw.

Also, I’ve never found anything about the New Globe having shown movies. The only references I’ve found to it say that the New Globe was a live house featuring Yiddish productions.

silver
silver on August 8, 2016 at 8:42 pm

to Joe Vogel:
How was it twinned from 59-63? Was “Riviera & Capri” in the cinema’s current space (which is really difficult for me to envision)? Or was a 2nd screen in an adjacent building? Or something else? Thx.

silver
silver on August 8, 2016 at 8:58 pm

question on name. Is rivest266’s August 8, 2016 post correct on when it became the “New Beverly”? My understanding was that it was Sherman Torgan, who took over the shuttered adult theater and began repertory programming in 1978, renamed it the “New Beverly Cinema” from the previous Beverly Cinema.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on August 8, 2016 at 11:34 pm

silver: Let me answer your question by first repairing the linkrot that has afflicted this comment I made a few years ago. The October 19, 1959, issue of Boxoffice ran this article about Robert Lippert’s Capri and Riviera Theatres.

As you’ll see from the floor plan in the article, it was only the building now occupied by the New Beverly Cinema that held both auditoriums. The movies I went to (both side usually featured double bills) were in the larger, right-hand auditorium, the Riviera, which was only 22 feet wide and seated 200. The smaller Capri to the left was only 15 feet wide and seated 100, so both were comparable in size to small, storefront nickelodeons of the early 20th century.

I was mistaken in my recent comment to say that Robert Lippert operated the twin until 1963 (and that it opened in 1959. I see the opening date of October 23, 1958, has been added above.) The Boxoffice article notes that he had sold the operation to Robert Rohauer before the article was published. I don’t know how long Rohauer operated the house. I’m pretty sure my visit to the Riviera was in late 1962 or early 1963. It was un-twinned and reopened as the single-screen New Yorker in 1963.

RogerA
RogerA on May 11, 2017 at 2:03 pm

This has become the temple of film. I violated the sanctity by looking at my cell phone to check the time was threatened by customer and told never to come back. Had to get the manager to get this guy to calm down and go away. They only run film. Most of their patrons are serious fans of film.

moviebuff82
moviebuff82 on May 11, 2017 at 2:35 pm

I learned about this theater by watching the documentary Out of Print on amazon prime. It’s pretty good.

troniks
troniks on June 6, 2017 at 12:19 pm

The Los Angeles Times posted a very nice article about the theater in their calendar section over the weekend.

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