Comments from Joe Vogel

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Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Oriental Theatre on Oct 8, 2011 at 2:18 am

The March 2, 1918, issue of The American Contractor published a notice saying that work had started on a one-storey theater that was being built on Washington Street in Canton. The project had been designed by local architect S. L. Milton. The owner’s name was not mentioned.

As the MGM report Ron Salters cited says that the Strand was built “about 1915,” it seems possible that it was this project. Canton had fewer than 6,000 people in 1920, so could conceivably have supported two theaters, but being a commuter suburb of Boston there would have been fairly easy access to that city’s many theaters, which makes it more likely that it would have had only one of its own.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Madison Theatre on Oct 7, 2011 at 2:49 am

Scott Schaut’s book “Historic Mansfield” says that the Madison Theatre was demolished in 1986.

The book also mentions a Majestic Theatre, located on Walnut Street, which was in operation by 1925, and says that the first permanent movie theaters in Mansfield, opened in 1908, were the Orpheum, the Arris, and the Alvin.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Ritz Theater on Oct 7, 2011 at 2:42 am

The current address of 427 North Main Street would be an unlikely location for a movie house. It’s in an industrial district, and across the street from a railroad line. The 1956 newspaper item Ken quoted above says that the Ritz was “…in the business district….” I suspect that either the address is wrong, or that Mansfield underwent a drastic renumbering at some point. The block of Main Street north of 4th Street currently has addresses with two or three digits, but I suspect that this was historically the 400 block.

The current address of the Mansfield Eagles lodge is 129-135 N. Main Street, but I don’t know if the lodge is still in the same building it was in when it was mentioned in the 1956 article. The building looks considerably more modern than the others on the block, but it does look old enough to have been in existence in 1956. In any case, it’s very likely that this is the block the Ritz was actually in. The lodge hall has parking lots on either side of it, and one or the other of those could have been the site of the Ritz.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Towne Theatre on Oct 7, 2011 at 2:40 am

There’s currently a Napa Auto Parts store at 1298 Abbott Road, and its building doesn’t have any resemblance to the theater building in the photos. The Towne Theatre must have been demolished.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Park Theatre on Oct 7, 2011 at 2:37 am

Two levels of windows have been punched into the side walls of the Park Theatre’s former auditorium, so the space has most likely been filled in with two floors of offices.

The only photo of the building I can find is this close shot of the area where the marquee once would have been.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Cox Theatre on Oct 5, 2011 at 6:07 pm

The March 11, 1916, issue of The Moving Picture World refers to a Cape May house called the Perry Street Theatre, run by a Mr. J. P. Cox. It’s probably a safe assumption that Perry Street Theatre was an AKA for the Cox Theatre, and it was probably located on Perry Street. The magazine said that the house was Cape May’s exclusive Paramount theater.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Rialto Theatre on Oct 5, 2011 at 5:04 pm

Sometimes the photo is there, and sometimes it isn’t, Chuck. Google Maps is still a work in progress, I guess. But at least they’ve got the Street View matched with the right address in this case.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Crest Theater on Oct 5, 2011 at 2:37 pm

Linkrot repair: Here is the October 7, 1950, Boxoffice page with the Heywood-Wakefield ad featuring two photos of the Crest Theatre.

Bonus link: The architect’s rendering of the Crest, as featured in Boxoffice of December 4, 1948.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Grand Opera House on Oct 3, 2011 at 6:26 pm

Encyclopedia Dubuque’s page for the Grand Opera House says that movies were first shown there in 1915, but I found an item in the July 4, 1908, issue of The Moving Picture World saying that movies were then being shown there.

The page gives the opening date of the Grand Opera House as August 14, 1890. Photographs reveal the exterior style of the building to be Romanesque Revival. I’ve been unable to discover any photos showing Rapp & Rapp’s 1910 interior.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Five Flags Center on Oct 3, 2011 at 5:18 pm

Although the former Majestic Theater is part of the Five Flags Center, the theater itself is billed as the Five Flags Theater (move Street View closer and see the name on the windows.)

Encyclopedia Dubuque has pages for the Majestic Theatre, which features three interior photos, and for the Orpheum Theatre, which has a photo showing the facade.

The line in the introduction saying that the Majestic was modeled after the original Moulin Rouge in Paris doesn’t make sense, as this is what the original Moulin Rouge looked like.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Avon Theatre on Oct 3, 2011 at 4:28 pm

This page at Encyclopedia Dubuque says that the architect of the Princess Theatre was Thomas T. Carkeek. It, too, says that the theater was renamed the Avon in 1928, but it also displays a complimentary season pass to the Princess Theatre dated 1933.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Avon Theatre on Oct 3, 2011 at 3:21 pm

The Encyclopedia Dubuque says that the Princess Theatre was renamed the Avon Theatre in August, 1928. The web page has a drawing of the theater.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theatre on Oct 3, 2011 at 2:16 pm

Encyclopedia Dubuque says that the Strand Theatre was in a building converted from a church in 1919. It was taken over by the Dubinsky circuit in 1976, and the building was gutted by a fire in August, 1980. It remained vacant for a decade, and was demolished in 1989-1990.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Biograph Theatre on Oct 1, 2011 at 4:52 am

The October 30, 1912, issue of The American Architect said that the proposed theater on Fayette Street in Syracuse would be operated under a long term lease by the Eckel Company. Plans for the project, by architect C. Merritt Curtis, were almost complete.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Plaza Theatre on Oct 1, 2011 at 4:33 am

This house was already called the Plaza by 1912, when the September 4 issue of The American Architect said that “…the Plaza Theatre, at Broad and Porter Sts.” had been acquired by William W. Miller, operator of the William Penn Theatre. The item mentioned Charles Oelschlager as architect for the project Miller planned to carry out on the site.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Bow-Tie Red Bank Cinemas on Oct 1, 2011 at 4:10 am

Here is Clearview’s web page for the Red Bank Art Cinemas.

The October 9, 1912, issue of The American Architect carried a notice about a theater that was to be built on White Street. The $20,000 project was being designed by the local firm J.C. & G.A. Delatush. White Street is only two blocks long. I wonder if this 1912 project, assuming it was carried out, is the house that became the Red Bank Art Cinemas?

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Civic Theatre on Oct 1, 2011 at 2:47 am

An item in the January 15, 1916, issue of The Moving Picture World said that a new theater called the Grand had opened in Osceola, Missouri. I’ve been unable to discover if the Grand was the same house that became the Civic, but Osceola being as small as it is, it’s possible that it only ever had the one theater. The building the Civic is in is typical of commercial structures built during the 1910s.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Capitol Theater on Oct 1, 2011 at 2:39 am

The Capitol Theatre was built in 1883 as the Frankfort Opera House, and was designed by none other than the noted Chicago theater architect Oscar Cobb. It was among the buildings listed in a 1971 survey of historic sites in Kentucky, prepared for the Kentucky Historical Commission.

The Frankfort Opera House and City Hall was also listed in an advertisement for Cobb’s firm that appeared in the 1884-1885 edition of Harry Miner’s American Dramatic Directory, and in an article about Cobb in a book about the Chicago Board of Trade published in 1885. Here, from the latter publication, is a list (probably not exhaustive) of theaters Cobb had designed up to that time:

“Wieting Opera House, Syracuse, N. Y.; Grand Opera House, Minneapolis, Minn.; Haverly’s new Columbia Theatre, Chicago, Ill.; Grand Opera House, St. Louis, Mo.; Schultz & Co.’s Opera House, Zanesville, O.; Coates' Opera House, Kansas City, Mo.; Nat. Mem. Theatre, Soldiers' Home, Dayton, O.; Faurot’s Opera House and Block, Lima, O.; Black’s Opera House, Springfield, O.; Sloane House and Block, Sandusky, O.; Academy of Music, Chicago, Ill.; Keokuk Opera House, Keokuk, Ia.; Standard Theatre, Chicago, Ill.; Heuck’s New Opera House, Cincinnati, O.; Opera House and City Hall, Frankfort, Ky., Doxey Theatre, Anderson, Ind.; Wood’s Opera House and Block, Sedalia, Mo.; Wilhelm’s Opera House, Portsmouth, O.; Case Opera House, Norwalk, O.; Washington Opera House, Maysville, Ky.; Louisville Opera House, Louisville, Ky.; Knowls Opera House, Washington, Kan.; New Grand Opera House, St. Louis, Mo.; Wellington City Hall and Opera House, Wellington, O.; Selma Opera House, Selma, Ala.; Belleville Opera House and Block, Belleville, Ill.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Park Theatre on Sep 30, 2011 at 6:08 pm

Here is a fresh link to the 1939 LOC photo of the Park Theatre (click thumbnail to embiggen.)

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about New Orpheum Theater on Sep 30, 2011 at 6:03 pm

The Orpheum is one of five Butte theaters depicted in this ca.1915 photomontage from a book published that year. The Orpheum is at upper right.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about American Theatre on Sep 30, 2011 at 6:03 pm

The building at 25 W. Park Street, on the site of the American Theatre, is now occupied by the Park Street Mall, a collection of small retail shops.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Manos Theater on Sep 29, 2011 at 6:43 pm

The overview says the theater was on Clay at 5th Street, so the address currently given is wrong. The only modern building near Clay and 5th is on the northeast corner, so that must be where the theater was. The building there now has a 5th Street address, but the theater’s address was probably 421 Clay, extrapolating from the address of the flower shop up the block at 415.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Opera Theatre on Sep 26, 2011 at 6:37 pm

Here is an updated link to the official web site of the Glenns Ferry Opera Theatre.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Esquire Theater on Sep 26, 2011 at 6:22 pm

Boxoffice Magazine’s 1970 article about the rebuilt Esquire, cited in my earlier comment, can be seen at this link.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Capri Theatre on Sep 26, 2011 at 3:13 pm

The address of the building at Cuyler and Francis is 300 N. Cuyler Street. It is currently listed on the HGTV Front Door real estate website, with two exterior photos of the sort that real estate agents take with their cellphones.