Comments from Broan

Showing 2,001 - 2,025 of 2,248 comments

Broan
Broan commented about Terminal Theatre on Jun 2, 2005 at 7:08 am

I went to the Terminal I site the other day and 3306 and 3308 are both entrances to the same store which would be in the old theatre space. Therefore the Terminal I and Metro/Metropolitan must be one and the same. It’s now a Korean discount store called “Shoes New York”. There is a good deal of attractive terracotta work remaining, albeit badly damaged. The theatre is faintly visible in the distance of this picture (Is it just me, or do the stores across the street seem to lack interiors?). Incidentally, and rather ironically, the Terminal II was likely torn down to make way for the rebuilt Kimball terminal (1974) for which it was named and from which it likely had drawn much of its business.

Broan
Broan commented about Publick Playhouse on May 30, 2005 at 10:31 am

Looks pretty much the same, except the box office window looks absent. I wonder why they changed the name? Cheverly seems more sensible than “Publick”… it’s certainly not ‘olde tyme’ style in the least.

Broan
Broan commented about Highland Park Theatre on May 29, 2005 at 5:57 pm

Updated photo link: View link

Broan
Broan commented about Arlington Theater on May 29, 2005 at 5:52 pm

the updated link to the 1940s photo is View link

Broan
Broan commented about Tivoli Theatre on May 29, 2005 at 5:43 pm

The updated link to Bryan’s Apr 23, 2004 postcard is View link

Broan
Broan commented about Congress Theater on May 27, 2005 at 8:07 am

Yeah, they’re the same boards that say “Congress Theatre”, actually, it’s embossed through.

Broan
Broan commented about Congress Theater on May 24, 2005 at 9:52 am

My mistake.

Broan
Broan commented about Stratford Theater on May 24, 2005 at 7:35 am

“As Hope and Byrne toured, they added more comedy to the act. When Hope found that he had a knack as a master of ceremonies, the act split, and Hope was booked as an "M.C.” at the Stratford Theater in Chicago in an engagement that would be seminal to his career. A master of ceremonies is a host, the link between the performance and the audience-providing continuity between scenes or acts by telling jokes, introducing performers, and assuring that the entertainment does not stop even if delays occurred backstage. Hope was such a success as a master of ceremonies in this Chicago engagement that his initial two-week booking was extended to six months.“
-http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/bobhope/vaude.html which also features a larger version of the photo displayed here, and an ad

Broan
Broan commented about Congress Theater on May 24, 2005 at 7:03 am

It was also once known as the teatro juan fernandez

Broan
Broan commented about Mode Theatre on May 23, 2005 at 9:02 pm

Does anybody know if the original name of the Mode (Keystone) had a relation to Keystone studios? Likewise for Biograph, Vitagraph

Broan
Broan commented about Mode Theatre on May 23, 2005 at 9:01 pm

I have photos chronicling the demolition of the Mode. Email me if you want them.

Broan
Broan commented about Wheaton Grand Theater on May 20, 2005 at 7:42 am

Certainly Paul must have some credibility if he’s been able to be involved in so many projects. A google search shows a number of different projects, and doesn’t neccessarily paint a flattering picture, but certainly there must be something more to the stories.

Broan
Broan commented about Echo Theatre on May 19, 2005 at 12:00 am

Address was 680 Lee. The former lobby is still intact. Also interesting to note that the current facade is not the original lobby; when built around 1915 it had a plainer, single story storefront. I believe the street was widened in the 1920s necessitating a new lobby, or it may have merely been a matter of modernization. The house was very long and narrow.

Broan
Broan commented about Capitol Theatre Chandelier Hung At DC Uptown on May 16, 2005 at 7:13 am

“We are excited to bring this antique chandelier from the Capitol to the nation�s capitol and its celebrated Uptown Theatre, which is such a historic and well-loved landmark for the area”

So excited they forgot how to spell capital?

Broan
Broan commented about Clark Theater on May 15, 2005 at 11:07 am

I think Bruce must be mistaken about the order of names- the photographs linked to on this entry prove that it opened as the Columbia (during construction, during for example), and was later the Adelphi (as in this 1927 view), before being renamed the Clark.

The 1911 Loop Street Address Renumeration Guide shows the address of the theatre entrance to be 11 N Clark and the hotel 15 N Clark. It’s not unusual for a theatre to take on the address of the building its part of, for example, the listed address for the Shubert/Majestic isn’t really accurate, so that’s likely what happened here.

I’d like to thank Bruce for all his important contributions to chicago film exhibition over the years. Although i’m too young to have experienced them, I can appreciate that he played quite an important role.

Broan
Broan commented about World Theatre on May 15, 2005 at 10:39 am

I think you’re right- from what I can tell looking at the entries, there appear to be three theaters here ultimately called “World”– theCalifornia (1909)/Liberty (1911)/Allies (~1918)/Crescent (~1922)/Liberty (1926)/World (~1949-1953), the Palace/Royal Palace/Royal/Verdi/World(1954-1982), and the 1983-1990s World, this entry. The comments and description from this should probably be moved to the Palace entry, the California needs an address, and this entry should probably be clarified that it refers to the World in the office building

Broan
Broan commented about Terminal Theatre on May 11, 2005 at 11:26 pm

Glad to help! I figured the time period was rather far off, but so it goes. Now, another question I had about the Terminal was this. What was the story with the original Terminal, which still stands? This site lists the Metro as 3306 W Lawrence, one door down from the shown address for the original Terminal. Jazz Age Chicago shows both at 3308. However, the former theatre entrance lies in the middle of a number of stores built with it, correct? So they couldn’t be next to each other. Jim Rankin, in other posts on this site about ‘backwards theatres’ includes an entry, “5) The METROPOLITAN, 3308 W. Lawrence, Chicago, IL (later TERMINAL, METRO)” So, are these in fact the same theatre? I would assume it would have reverted to the Metro name upon opening of the new Terminal. On the other hand, Terminal I is shown as a 1500 seat vaudeville/movie venue on Jazz Age and Metro shown as a 1000 seat backwards venue here, so these are clearly not compatible descriptions… anyone know what the story is?

Broan
Broan commented about Imperial Theatre on May 11, 2005 at 6:57 pm

The Imperial is visible in this photo documenting the 1968 riots. The 4 Star (Wilson) is visible in the distance. Ironically, the signboard reads “Come in, relax, and see a movie in comfort”

Broan
Broan commented about Pickwick Theatre on May 11, 2005 at 5:37 pm

In comparing these two photos, I notice that the starburst parts of the marquee are not actually present in the earlier picture. They must be retrofit. Interesting, the older photo looks more deco.

Broan
Broan commented about Portage Theater on May 11, 2005 at 5:30 pm

Here is a 1953 photo of the then-bustling Six Corners, with the Portage’s vertical sign faintly visible in the background.

Broan
Broan commented about Terminal Theatre on May 11, 2005 at 5:14 pm

Here is a circa 1929 Photo of Lawrence avenue facing west towards the second Terminal, as well as the Metro across the street.

Broan
Broan commented about Garrick Theatre on May 11, 2005 at 8:49 am

Here is one from 1919

Broan
Broan commented about Pickwick Theatre on May 11, 2005 at 7:52 am

View link Here is a circa 1930 view of the exterior, looking almost the same as it does now. The updated URL to Bryan’s 1950s postcard view is View link

Broan
Broan commented about Nortown Theater on May 11, 2005 at 7:47 am

View link Here is another 1960 view of the interior.

Broan
Broan commented about Today Theater on May 3, 2005 at 8:08 pm

The book “Chicago’s Loop” claims that the Castle theatre on State was the first newsreel theatre in chicago, beginning in 1932