Comments from Coate

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Coate
Coate commented about TCL Chinese Theatre on May 24, 2015 at 2:07 pm

The Chinese was a neighborhood house, too, for much of its early life.

Coate
Coate commented about TCL Chinese Theatre on May 24, 2015 at 1:41 pm

I believe the Village and Bruin were, essentially, “neighborhood” houses during the initial decades of their existence. I don’t think they became “first-run” (depending on how one defines such) until the 1970s when the prime L.A. booking zones shifted from downtown & Beverly Hills to Hollywood & Westwood/Century City.

Coate
Coate commented about Cinema East on May 15, 2015 at 11:35 am

buckohio1165…

“Superman” didn’t play at Cinema East (not first-run, anyway). There’s a listing of the first-run theaters where it played in this retrospective article I put together a couple of years ago. Scroll down to the Ohio section. I hope the article brings back wonderful memories of seeing “Superman” when it was new.

Coate
Coate commented about Sun-Ray Cinema on May 9, 2015 at 9:13 pm

It has been said that this theater hosted the longest run of “The Godfather.” I’ve never vetted this, so I can’t say if it’s an accurate claim or not.

Coate
Coate commented about Holiday Six Theatres on Apr 23, 2015 at 3:13 pm

If there was another operator between Holiday and AMC, it would’ve been brief. Holiday, I believe, operated the theater through at least 1980, and AMC took over no later than 1984. If anyone has a more precise ownership timeline, please post.

Coate
Coate commented about Six Flags Cinema 1-5 on Apr 23, 2015 at 2:53 pm

“Star Wars” had a 25-week run here and ought to be lumped in with “The Godfather,” “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” and “Raiders of the Lost Ark” as among the theater’s biggest hits.

Coate
Coate commented about Holiday Six Theatres on Apr 22, 2015 at 9:01 pm

So, two paragraphs and one-hundred ninety-eight words later, I guess the answer to my question is: “Holiday Theatres Inc.” Thank you, Joe.

Oh, and I’m sorry if this comes off as snarky, but if some effort had been made to recognize my Remembering Cinerama series generously posted right here on Cinema Treasures instead of the all-too-common habit of referencing other, less reliable resources, you would’ve noted the Holiday had shown a Cinerama movie and that other Cinerama movies were shown in Buffalo in between How the West Was Won and Grand Prix.

Coate
Coate commented about Holiday Six Theatres on Apr 22, 2015 at 11:20 am

What company ran this theater before AMC?

Coate
Coate commented about Eastwood Theatre on Apr 12, 2015 at 3:52 am

Does anyone know what the “Y” and the “W” stood for in Y&W Management (the company that operated the Eastwood)?

Coate
Coate commented about North Star Cinema on Apr 7, 2015 at 2:26 pm

It was 50 years ago today that “The Sound of Music” premiered at the North Star Mall. With a reserved-seat run of 82 weeks, it’s almost certainly the long-run record holder for this venue. (Anyone know of something that ran longer?)

Coate
Coate commented about Fox Theatre on Apr 7, 2015 at 2:25 pm

It was 50 years ago today that “The Sound of Music” premiered at the Fox. With a reserved-seat run of 116 weeks, it’s almost certainly the long-run record holder for this venue. (Anyone know of something that ran longer?) It was one of ten runs in the United States and at least 24 globally that ran the movie continuously into a third year.

Coate
Coate commented about (New) Nixon Theatre on Apr 7, 2015 at 2:24 pm

It was 50 years ago today that “The Sound of Music” premiered at the Nixon. With a reserved-seat run of 106 weeks, it’s almost certainly the long-run record holder for this venue. (Anyone know of something that ran longer?) It was one of ten runs in the United States and at least 24 globally that ran the movie continuously into a third year.

Coate
Coate commented about Dundee Theater on Apr 7, 2015 at 2:23 pm

It was 50 years ago today that “The Sound of Music” premiered at the Dundee. With a reserved-seat run of 118 weeks, it’s almost certainly the long-run record holder for this venue. (Anyone know of something that ran longer?) It was one of ten runs in the United States and at least 24 globally that ran the movie continuously into a third year.

Coate
Coate commented about Tower Theater on Apr 7, 2015 at 2:23 pm

It was 50 years ago today that “The Sound of Music” premiered at the Tower. With a reserved-seat run of 82 weeks, it’s almost certainly the long-run record holder for this venue. (Anyone know of something that ran longer?)

Coate
Coate commented about Riverview Theatre on Apr 7, 2015 at 2:21 pm

It was 50 years ago today that “The Sound of Music” premiered at the Riverview. With a reserved-seat run of 115 weeks, it’s almost certainly the long-run record holder for this venue. (Anyone know of something that ran longer?) It was one of ten runs in the United States and at least 24 globally that ran the movie continuously into a third year.

Coate
Coate commented about Paramount Theatre on Apr 7, 2015 at 2:19 pm

It was 50 years ago today that “The Sound of Music” premiered at the Paramount. With a reserved-seat run of 79 weeks, it’s almost certainly the long-run record holder for this venue. (Anyone know of something that ran longer?)

Coate
Coate commented about Rialto Theatre on Apr 7, 2015 at 2:17 pm

It was 50 years ago today that “The Sound of Music” premiered at the Rialto. With a reserved-seat run of 64 weeks, it’s almost certainly the long-run record holder for this venue. (Anyone know of something that ran longer?) It was one of more than 70 engagements in North America that ran the movie longer than one year.

Coate
Coate commented about Sun-Ray Cinema on Apr 7, 2015 at 2:10 pm

It was 50 years ago today that “The Sound of Music” premiered at the 5 Points. With a reserved-seat run of 31 weeks, it’s almost certainly the long-run record holder for this venue. (Anyone know of something that ran longer?)

Coate
Coate commented about Capri Theatre on Apr 7, 2015 at 2:08 pm

It was 50 years ago today that “The Sound of Music” premiered at the Capri. With a reserved-seat run of 113 weeks, it’s surely the long-run record holder for this venue. (Anyone know of something that ran longer?) It was one of ten runs in the United States and at least 24 globally that ran the movie continuously into a third year.

Coate
Coate commented about Northland Cinema on Apr 7, 2015 at 2:05 pm

It was 50 years ago today that “The Sound of Music” premiered at Northland. With a reserved-seat run of 84 weeks, it’s almost certainly the long-run record holder for this venue. (Anyone know of something that ran longer?) It was one of more than 70 engagements in North America that ran the movie longer than one year.

“The Sound of Music” also was the second of two consecutive long-running Julie Andrews movies to play this venue during 1965-66. That two-year period must’ve been bliss or hell for local moviegoers depending on whether or not they were a fan of Julie!

Coate
Coate commented about Dabel Cinema on Apr 7, 2015 at 1:58 pm

It was 50 years ago today that “The Sound of Music” premiered at the Dabel. With a reserved-seat run of 105 weeks, it’s almost certainly the long-run record holder for this venue. (Anyone know of something that ran longer?) It was one of ten runs in the United States and at least 24 globally that ran the movie continuously into a third year.

Coate
Coate commented about Palace Theater on Apr 7, 2015 at 1:26 pm

Nick… I’m pleased to see others mentioning the 50th anniversary of “The Sound of Music” given that film’s popularity and the fact it holds the long-run record in many (most?) of the theaters in which it played. That’s trivia to some, of course, but to me it’s essential information for a website such as this one that seeks to document the history of movie theaters.

You may have noticed during March I had been mentioning on the relevant pages here an “It premiered fifty years ago today” for the theaters in which “The Sound of Music” opened during its first couple of weeks. But a lack of subsequent comments suggested few were interested in such information and so I skipped the bookings for the last week of March. (Or maybe it was the article plugs that readers found off-putting?) Anyway, maybe now I’ll resume with the April 7th bookings (other than Tampa’s Palace since you just mentioned it).

Coate
Coate commented about Belle Meade Theatre on Apr 7, 2015 at 1:18 pm

Any Nashvillers recall what the Belle Meade’s Christmas 1980 booking was? (“Flash Gordon”? “Popeye”? “Nine to Five”? Other?)

Coate
Coate commented about Capitol Theatre on Mar 30, 2015 at 11:31 am

bigjoe59… How ‘bout you comment on my previous reply before moving on to new questions?! Sheesh. Granted, I don’t think I actually asked any questions in my last reply, but you’d think something in there would’ve prompted a reply of some kind. At least maybe a “thanks for the info” or a new question based on something stated. Whatever.

As for your (sigh) new questions… I can’t comment on your souvenir program or intermission request. Someone else will have to chime in. As for the NYC roadshow theaters you cited, I’d say the list for such bookings during your time-frame was more than double the number you have.

It doesn’t matter to me whether you’re compiling information for a to-be-published project or if you’re just curious. Several folks here, myself included, enjoy the discussions and exchange of information, but at times your requests come off like you’re expecting others to do all of the labor (research). Anyone else feel this way, or am I misinterpreting?

Coate
Coate commented about Capitol Theatre on Mar 28, 2015 at 11:06 am

bigjoe59…

Regarding Kim R. Holston’s “Movie Roadshows” book, I’ve read much of it but not every single entry. Overall I think it’s pretty good even though I spotted quite a number of errors. I think it’ll appeal more to readers unfamiliar or less familiar with roadshows than to those coming to the book with knowledge of the subject, as those already familiar will more easily spot errors or questionable claims which could be a distraction to the reading experience and lessens the book’s value as worthy reference material.

“The Trojan Women” isn’t Holston’s only omission. As well, he has some titles listed in the “Anomalies” section that, in my opinion, should’ve been placed in the main part of the book. He also backed himself into a corner by including a few titles that were not true roadshows and were actually reserved-performance engagements rather than specifically reserved-seat engagements. This is why I mentioned in my previous comment how the book could’ve been extended beyond 1972 [sic] since he had (inadvertently) included a couple of titles that would’ve been better off in the anomalies section.

There is another recently published roadshow book: Matthew Kennedy’s “Roadshow! The Fall of Film Musicals in the 1960s.” As well, in 1998, Widescreen Review magazine published in one of their special edition issues a lengthy article on roadshows, which included titles not mentioned in Holston’s (and, naturally, its share of questionable claims), but nevertheless essential reading for anyone with a serious interest in the subject.

I doubt Holston could give us any playdate info on “Gypsy.” If he had any he would’ve surely included it. Personally, I think he is under the mistaken impression “Gypsy” was a roadshow simply because of the presence of an overture on the album.

I’ve interview Holston a couple of times, by the way, the most recent being for the 50th anniversary of “The Sound of Music,” which can be read here. FYI: the article is a four-pager (two pages devoted to a historian Q&A and another two devoted to the film’s roadshow exhibition history). I hope you and any others with an interest in the subject will enjoy it.