Closings

  • September 8, 2016

    San Jose, CA – Downtown San Jose’s Camera 12 Movie Theater to Close

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    From San Jose Inside: Downtown San Jose is losing its only first-run movie theater. Camera 12 Cinemas, San Jose’s largest independently owned movieplex, announced today that it will punch its final tickets this Friday, Sep. 9. Camera Cinemas’ two other theater complexes—Camera 3, located just blocks from Camera 12, and Camera 7 in Campbell—will remain open.

    “I’m really sad—really sad,” said Jack NyBlom, a managing partner of Camera Cinemas. However, he added, the closure simply could not be avoided. “A decade’s loss of revenue from a promised growing residential market, that’s just now coming online, coupled with the staggering costs of maintaining a large, aging, poorly designed building has led us to this decision to close.”

    Camera Cinema’s spokesman, Dan Orloff, said that years of accumulated debt posed a challenge to the local ownership group. The “straw that broke the camel’s back,” Orloff says, was the tenant’s obligation to maintain and repair the roofs, escalators and other building elements, which were in serious disrepair.

    Camera 12 took over the taxpayer-subsidized cinderblock building next to the federal courthouse and Fairmont Hotel in July 2004, several years after United Artists moved out of the complex without notice in the middle of the night. The $11 million, 70,000-square-foot complex received $4.4 million in city redevelopment funds after another national chain, AMC, abandoned its plans for a 16-screen complex as part of the Pavilion, a Redevelopment-sponsored retail mall that was eventually converted into a computer server farm.

    In December 2000, just four years after the theater was built, Redevelopment Agency director Susan Shick tried to knock it down. “The theater is obsolete,” Shick said. “It’s not a theater built to modern-day standards.” Things turned around after the Cameras leased the facility, and both private and public money was poured into maintaining the operation.

    And yet it was not enough. According to NyBlom, after a tile fell from the cieling a few weeks back, it was discovered that the building had some serious plumbing issues. Plus, he added, the theater’s escalators were proving to be both a hazard and a money pit. “It’s just not a safe environment for our customers anymore,” he said.

    NyBlom is pleased that Camera Cinemas’ other two locations, Camera 3 and Camera 7, will be able to keep showing films. But even though both theaters are doing well, he believes the loss of the independent Camera 12 represents a major blow to downtown San Jose culture.

    For starters, Camera Cinemas has always made it a priority to work with the local community in ways larger theater chains might not. At Camera 7, for instance, on the first and third Wednesday of every month, there are special showings for parents with infants—the idea being, if everyone in the crowd is bringing a baby, no one will object to a little crying.

    Camera 12 has also been a major hub for screenings during the Cinequest Film Festival. “We’re going to try to continue to work with Cinequest,” NyBlom said, noting that Camera 3 will remain available as will Camera 7. However, that does leave a big vacuum when it comes to downtown screenings. “We have a 27-year relationship with those guys. We’ll try to get them placed wherever we can.”

    Camera Cinemas has also served as a force for good in sticking up for other independent theaters. After moving into the Camera 12 building in 2004, Camera Cinemas sued the national Century Theater chain over their practice of creating “clearance agreements” with movie studios. These agreements would guarantee Century had exclusive rights to screen certain movies for a certain period of time within a given region—sort of like the radius clauses live music venues make bands sign, preventing many acts from playing both San Francisco and San Jose in succession.

    Their legal action proved fruitful—at least in San Jose—after then-Attorney General Bill Lockyer launched an antitrust investigation into the practice of clearance agreements. Though no legal action was taken, Century backed off and Camera Cinemas won the rights to screen first-run films at Camera 12, a major coup for the independent theater.

    The suit may have also played a role in spurring other independent theaters to take fight clearance agreements in their regions.

    See below for the full Camera Cinemas news release.

  • September 7, 2016

    Danvers, MA – Hollywood Hits closed for good

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    From the Salem News: Due to a number variables, the credits have rolled on the independent movie theater Hollywood Hits, which closed Monday night.

    “We regret to inform you that we have closed,” the theater said on its website. “We thank all of our customers for their patronage over the past 17 years.”

    Since 1999, the small, independent cinema at 7 Hutchinson Drive showed movies on the North Shore as a low-price alternative to seeing films in large multiplexes.

    It was a place to catch both first-run movies and movies that appealed to the art crowd. Its concessions were also less expensive than those at the chains.

    Reached by phone Tuesday, owner and Beverly resident Scott Przybycien confirmed the announcement.

    “That is true,” he said. “We closed the doors last night.”

    Przybycien said he was “heavy-hearted” having to close up the cinema building for the last time.

    The theater, visible from Route 128 north, had been a corporate chain until 1999, when Loews left the location for a space in the Liberty Tree Mall, Przybycien said.

    In 1999, Hollywood Hits started off as a discount theater, but changes in the industry saw it become an art house that also showed first-run films.

    In recent years, Hollywood Hits was able to run the same mainstream blockbusters as the AMC Loews Liberty Tree Mall 20, and Przybycien said his theater was doing well with this product.

    In May, “X-Men: Apocalypse” was the first movie that 20th Century Fox dropped clearances to allow both the chain theaters and the independents to run the same films at the same time, Przybycien said. That was good news.

    But a number of factors conspired to keep Hollywood Hits from showing the hits well into the future.

  • August 29, 2016

    Philadelphia, PA – Pearl Theatre at Avenue North closes, to be replaced with AMC

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    From philly.com: The Pearl Theatre at Avenue North closed over the weekend, ending a decade-long run for the seven-screen movie house at Temple University’s North Philadelphia campus. It will be replaced by what Avenue North developer Bart Blatstein calls “the city’s first high-end” movie theater from AMC Theaters.

    “It is a testimony for the support of this theater and how great the community around it is,” Blatstein said of the incoming AMC on Monday, adding that much of the Pearl’s business came from neighborhood residents.

    AMC, which will convert the former Pearl into one of its own locations, currently offers a number of novel approaches to the moviegoing experience, including food service and alcoholic beverages in some areas. What amenities the coming theater at Avenue North will offer was not immediately clear.

  • August 1, 2016

    Springfield, MO – Springfield multiplex theater ends 20 year run with final films Sunday

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    From KY3.com: The curtain comes down Sunday on a 20-year run for a Springfield movie theater.

    Wehrenberg’s Campbell 16 Theatre will close at the end of Sunday’s showings. The company announced earlier this summer that it would close the theater, saying it could not compete in a market with so many movie screens. There are two other complexes showing first-run movies with between 11 and 14 screens.

    The theater will close with a little Hollywood fictional tie to the Ozarks. One of the last films showing is Jason Bourne, starring Matt Damon. The character’s back story in the series of films is that he was born in Nixa.

    The theater will not stay closed for long. Alamo Drafthouse Cinema announced plans this month to renovate the theater and open next winter as a multiplex with a full service restaurant, bar and several movie screens.

  • Bridgeport, CT – Supporters rally to save historic Bridgeport theater set to close

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    From News12CT.com: Staff and supporters of a historic Bridgeport theater held a rally Sunday in an effort to keep the venue from shutting its doors for good next week.

    The owners of the Bijou Theater on Fairfield Avenue say they can’t afford to keep the theater up and running.

    Members of the group rallying say they are all deeply invested in the nonprofit community theater and are trying to raise $100,000…

  • July 5, 2016

    Sioux City, IA – Riviera 4 theater ends run in Sioux City

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    From the Sioux City Journal:
    Sioux City’s financially troubled second-run movie theater ended a 12-year run Thursday.

    Riviera 4 Theater owner Eric Hilsabeck announced the closing in a letter posted on the theater’s Facebook page. As a show of appreciation to its customers, movie-goers were admitted free on the final day to its films, which included “Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice” and “Kung Fu Panda 3.”

    Hilsabeck cited shortened release times between first-run movie theaters and video-on-demand services as a primary reason for the Riviera 4 closing.

    “Previous to this change, we were guaranteed that our distribution window would be free from any other form of competitive distribution,” he said in the statement. “However, over the last two years, our release window has dissolved almost completely.”

    The Rivera was the last second-run theater operating in Iowa, he said. The shortening of the distribution window, he predicted, would force the closure of all remaining such theaters worldwide.

    Earlier this year, Hilsabeck told the Journal that the Rivera 4 was looking for new options with the property facing foreclosure.

    In the Facebook page statement, Hilsabeck said options are still being sought for the building, but nothing would prevent the theater’s closing.

    In the statement, Hilsabeck thanked and recommended Security National Bank for “their receptiveness to small business owners in Sioux City.”

    Security National Bank had earlier asked for a judgment of foreclosure and sale of the property at 714 Fourth St. to repay nearly $400,000 in loans the bank said Hilsabeck and Beck Theatres had defaulted on.

    The city of Sioux City and a Delaware company also had taken legal action to recover money loaned to Hilsabeck.

    The Riviera closed as a first-run movie theater in the 1990s. Hilsabeck reopened the Riviera as a second-run theater in 2004 after the building had briefly housed a night club.

  • May 4, 2016

    Odessa, TX – Curtain Call Nears for Historic Ector Theatre

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    The Ector Theatre that drew families to the center of a humming downtown finally faded from its old glory in 1985, when its original owner locked the doors after more than three decades and walked away. By then, it had become a financial burden.

    But for the last 15 years, Don and Toni Stice kept the historic venue alive even in the age of the multiplex. They leased the building for a pittance from the City of Odessa, which bought the 1950s-era theater in 1994 for $155,000 in federal funds with hopes of keeping it open to the public.

    He served as the artistic director and her as the business manager keeping the books. Performers and the classic films returned to the marquee.

    “They loved being entertained by that,” Don Stice said in an interview inside the Ector Theatre, where he first came to work in 1959 as a projectionist. “They love going back in time. I call this place a time machine.”

    That ends this month, after a final series of events, as the city begins laying the groundwork for a downtown hotel and convention center estimated to cost some $77 million and incorporate the theater. The city will not tear down the Ector Theatre but officials are still working out the specific plans about how to renovate and reopen it.

    But first, there will be a performance by a Johnny Cash tribute artist on May 7. Then, the Ector Theatre will show “The Last Picture Show” on May 13 and May 14.

    Finally, after a couple junior high choir shows and an Odessa High reunion, the Ector Theatre will close.

  • January 21, 2016

    It’s Fade to Black for Midtown’s Iconic Ziegfeld Movie Theater

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    It’s fade to black for Midtown’s iconic movie palace the Ziegfeld movie theater — but the iconic venue at 141 W. 54th St. will be reborn as a spectacular high-end event space, The (NY) Post has learned.

  • January 8, 2015

    “Bow Tie Cinemas Permanently Closes Bedford Playhouse” From Bedford, NY.

    Mention of the location, which is in Bedford Village, had been removed from the company’s website by Monday. The location and details were displayed on the website as recently as Sunday, which was also the last date for scheduled show times.

    People at the Playhouse site also confirmed that the movie theater closed on Sunday. Workers were busy coming out of the theater’s bottom level, with several items being moved out.

    Read the entire article online at chappaqua.dailyvoice.com

  • October 22, 2014

    Showplace closes its doors

    BLANCHESTER, OH — With a building dating back to 1941 the Showplace Cinemas has closed. Called the cheapest theatre in the U.S. (i.e. the cheapest patron-cost to see movie), the discount theatre could not convert its three screens to digital. They hope to reopen soon.

    Visit their website for further details.