Renovations

  • December 9, 2015

    Developer May Get Exclusive Right to Put a Dinner Theater in Historic Utah Theater

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    Salt Lake City leaders are weighing an exclusive deal with a private developer on plans to refurbish the old Utah Theater on Main Street — just as Mayor Ralph Becker prepares to leave office.

    The city’s Redevelopment Agency Board, which doubles as the City Council, is set to vote Tuesday on whether to start exclusive talks on the abandoned theater with LaSalle Restaurant Group, a Utah-based firm that owns Golden Braid Books, the Oasis Cafe and other notable restaurants.

  • December 2, 2015

    Broadway’s Palace Theatre Will Be Lifted by Four Floors

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    Times Square’s Palace Theatre was once as high as you could get in the world of Vaudeville. Soon, it will get a little higher. Robert Viagas and PLAYBILL reports that Broadway’s Palace Theatre will be lifted by four floors to make room for retail space.

  • November 10, 2015

    Historic Theatre News: A $24.3 Million Plan to Restore Tacoma’s Historic Pantages Theater

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    A $24.3 million plan to restore Tacoma’s historic Pantages Theater, including exterior work and seismic upgrades, is slated to begin next year and eventually close the theater for 18 months.

  • October 2, 2015
  • September 29, 2015

    Restoration News From the Garden Theatre in Pittsburgh, PA

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    To generations before ours, the Garden was known as a lovingly cared-for theater that thrived as a cultural center for the neighborhood. Three new developments, finally, are pushing the Garden Theater block closer to becoming a source of community pride once again.

  • September 25, 2015
  • September 16, 2015

    Historic Admiral Theatre to Get Substantial Makeover

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    When you step inside the Admiral Theatre, it’s as if you’re stepping back in time. That’s because the West Seattle movie house, which sits along California Avenue SW, has gone largely untouched—save for a few tweaks in the ‘60s and '70s—since opening in 1942. (The theater first opened in 1919 as the Portola. You can read more about its extensive history here.)

  • September 12, 2015

    Glendale’s Historic Alex Theatre Celebrates 90th Birthday

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    “Visitors got a sneak peek at the restored beacon of downtown Glendale – the highly visible tower with a spire atop at the Alex Theatre as it was briefly relit about a week ahead of the historic venue’s 90th birthday.

    Redoing the 100-foot-tall neon tower was the latest in a series of restoration efforts over the past several years. “The tower and the spire itself have been kind of falling apart for the last three years,” said Elissa Glickman, chief executive of Glendale Arts, the nonprofit that manages the theater.

    In addition to the neon, there are sequential chase lights that light up vertically along the tower. Those lights were previously incandescent bulbs, which burnt out quickly, she said. LED ones are used now and last longer. “LED has a life span of five to 10 years, not to mention the energy-efficient component,” Glickman said. Four years ago, the marquee and the Alex sign were redone. Last year, a $5-million face lift added expanded dressing rooms. The renovations wrapped up ahead of the Alex’s 90th anniversary of when it first opened its doors on Sept. 4, 1925.

  • January 11, 2015

    “Principals, city officials see what’s ahead in Lincoln Theater’s future” From Port Angeles, WA.

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    Dan Gase, the real estate agent in the process of brokering the sale of the shuttered Lincoln Theater, was in a sunny mood at a meeting with city officials.

    “I thought I’d run to Swain’s and get popcorn,” Gase quipped at the movie house Thursday.

    Joining him there: would-be theater buyer Scott Nagel, architect Michael Gentry, Port Angeles city building inspector Jim Lierly and city Fire Chief Ken Dubuc.

    Last month, Nagel, producer of the Dungeness Crab & Seafood Festival in Port Angeles and the former director of the Seattle Folklife Festival and Sequim Lavender Festival, made his move to buy the theater, which has been dark since last spring.

    Nagel offered Sun Basin Theatres, the Lincoln’s owner, $235,000, and now “he’s the buyer in first position,” Gase said.

    But Nagel has no plans to buy the Lincoln with his own money.

    He intends to instead find large donors who share his vision: restoring the Lincoln building at 132 E. First St. into a 500-seat film and performing arts center.

    Read the entire article online at peninsuladailynews.com

  • December 17, 2014

    “New sign crowns Cameo Theater Building in Mills 50” From Orlando, FL.

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    As part of the Cameo Theater Building restoration a new sign has been installed on top of the building.

    The sign was designed using the same font and lighting style of the original marquee after a historic picture of the Theater was found.

    A small business façade improvement grant from the City of Orlando helped pay for the fabrication and installation of the sign.

    The theater was built in 1939 and converted to offices for IBM in the 1950s. At some point, the original marquee was removed.

    Read the entire article online at bungalower.com.